MIAMI PROJECT 5

Booth 16

December 1 – 4, 2016

E2 - KLEINVELD & JULIEN
Ode to Leutze's Washington Crossing the Delaware, 2016
archival pigment print
30.5 x 48 inches
extra large: 30.5 x 48 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
large: 20 x 30 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
medium: 16 x 20 inches, edition of 5, 2 APs

E2 - KLEINVELD & JULIEN
Ode to Van Eyck's Arnolfini Marriage, 2012
archival pigment print
large: 30 x 20 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
medium: 24 x 15 inches, edition of 5, 2 APs
small: 19 x 13 inches, edition of 7, 2 APs

E2 - KLEINVELD & JULIEN
Ode to Vermeer's Girl with a Pearl Earring, 2012
archival pigment print
large: 32 x 26 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
medium: 24 x 15 inches, edition of 5, 2 APs
small: 19 x 13 inches, edition of 7, 2 APs

E2 - KLEINVELD & JULIEN
Ode to Manet's Dejeuner sur l'herbe, 2011
archival pigment print
large: 20 x 30 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
medium: 15 x 24 inches, edition of 5, 2 APs
small: 13 x 19 inches, edition of 7, 2 APs

E2 - KLEINVELD & JULIEN
Adam and Steve, 2013
archival pigment print
large: 30 x 20 inches, edition of 3, 2 APs
medium: 24 x 15 inches, edition of 5, 2 APs
small: 19 x 13 inches, edition of 7, 2 APs

RICHELLE GRIBBLE
Land-Sea-Air, 2016
ink, graphite, colored pencil on wood
36 x 36 inches

BONNIE MAYGARDEN
The Night Light, 2016
acrylic on canvas
24 x 48 inches

BONNIE MAYGARDEN
Icons, 2016
acrylic on canvas
16-panel polyptych, 9 x 12 inches each

BONNIE MAYGARDEN
Disrupted Pair I, 2016
acrylic on canvas
30 x 48 inches
diptych

BONNIE MAYGARDEN
Disrupted Pair II, 2016
acrylic on canvas
30 x 48 inches
diptych

TI-ROCK MOORE
'Merica, 2016
mixed media
72 x 36 x 36 inches


This piece brings under scrutiny the conservative right wing’s unrelenting support of the second amendment, the right to keep and bear arms. The whiteness of the vending machine and presence of hand rifles, and bibles, denotes the culture of white supremacy and Christianity, both ideologies often closely linked to these objects. Equally, the placement of lethal weapons inside of a vending machine is a criticism of how readily available firearms are across the United States. Here, Moore insists that if the National Rifle Association’s power continues to successfully push against gun control policy, mass shootings such as the 2016 Pulse Night Club massacre, will continue to occur. In pairing guns and bibles together, Moore brings to light the irony of holding such contradicting values as enabling hate crimes and violence while claiming allegiance to a faith that insists upon compassion, humility, and so-called tolerance for your neighbor.

TI-ROCK MOORE
Flint, 2016
mixed media
48 x 12 x 12 inches

Moore’s piece “Flint” is an overtly speaks out against the mismanagement of the water crisis in Michigan, Flint, which began in 2014. The brown water constantly flowing from the bright white water fountain signals the ongoing situation in the majority black town, as well as, the extreme limitations placed on communities of color due to flawed infrastructures that privilege the needs of affluent and often predominantly white communities.

TI-ROCK MOORE
Vile, 2016
neon
76 x 34 inches

The neon crosses spelling out the terms “white” and “privilege” is a criticism of the prominence of European Christianity in the United States and the unearned advantage held by white Americans. The word “vile” is highlighted in red neon, as an expression of the immorality that white privilege prompts. 

TI-ROCK MOORE
"GREAT" Again, 2016
mixed media
48 x 72 x 6 inches


Always aligning her work with contemporary issues, '"GREAT" Again' speaks to the extreme right-wing rhetoricthat endorsed and supported the eventual election of Donald J. Trump as President of the United States. The upside down positioning of the American flag, signaling dire distress, is a thematic element of Moore’s current body of work. However, here the whiteness and resulting subtlety of the defining characteristics of the American flag, is a visual metaphor of the unforeseeable rise of white supremacy that is notably slated to run Trump’s administration. The shocking success of Trump’s presidential campaign denotes a fearful reality for many, particularly since greatness under these terms is equated with whiteness.

TI-ROCK MOORE
Cracka House Village, 2016
mixed media
48 x 24 x 24 inches


This series is an extension of Moore’s initial 6-foot tall mix media piece “Cracka House.” The series investigates the patterns of gentrification, which often begin with unassuming young whites looking for affordable housing in urban communities of color on the brink of a transition. Moore further implies that the subsequent “revitalization” of a once troubled community is only accelerated when the demographic shifts toward whiteness. This domino effect ironically mirrors the migratory chains of immigrant communities, however, structural and even aesthetic improvements that follow this demographic shift clearly point to a gap in living standards between races and therefore racial inequality. Additionally, the displacement of residents of color due to drastic rent increases,exemplify what Moore considers to be modern-day colonization.

TI-ROCK MOORE
Cracka Please, 2016
mixed media
42 x 42 inches


Moore continues to inject humor into her manipulation of the Premium Cracker box as an object of satire. The image of the Premium Cracker brand one of familiarity, but often associated with recovering from a stomach illness or general staleness comments on the absurdity of value placed on white contemporary art, for instance, and investigates the authenticity of historical art movements like Pop Art. Beyond the wordplay, which pokes fun at one of the few derogatory phrases used to describe Caucasians, adorning something as mundane as a literal cracker box with Swarovski crystals, reveals a celebration of white mediocrity in not only the contemporary art world, butmuch of capitalistic American society. 

ADAM MYSOCK
On a Snowy Night, 2016
acrylic on panel
6 x 9.25 inches
after: Nighthawks (1942) by Edward Hopper

ADAM MYSOCK
Where the Snow in Snow Globes Came From, 2016
acrylic on panel
6 x 7.75 inches

ADAM MYSOCK
The Problem with Conspiracy Theories is in the Delivery, 2016
acrylic on panel
6.75 x 9.625 inches

ADAM MYSOCK
What's Left, 2015
acrylic on panel 5.75 x 8 inches

ADAM MYSOCK
Waiting for the Pool to Open, 2014
acrylic on panel
9 x 12 inches

ADAM MYSOCK
The Consequences of Empty Threats, 2014
acrylic on panel
9 x11.5 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
A Seed Under the Tongue and a Song Upon the Air, 2016
27 x 10.5 inches
mixed media collage on antique book covers
 

MICHAEL PAJON
Power and Glory, 2016
32 x 9 inches
mixed media collage on antique book covers

MICHAEL PAJON
Every Town Turns Jungle and Tigers Prowl, 2016
mixed media collage on cabinet card
10 x 8 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
Ophelia Beset by Suitors, 2016
mixed media collage on antique book cover
13 x 10 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
Sisters of Fate, Daughters of Night, 2016
mixed media collage on antique book cover
15 x 20 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
She Perched Upon the Ruins of Men, 2016
mixed media collage on antique book cover
10 x 13 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
Rod of Mercury, 2016
mixed media collage on antique book cover
18 x 12 inches

MICHAEL PAJON

She Smites Her Enemies with a Hiss and a Glance, 2015

mixed media collage on antique book cover

16.5 x 12.5 inches

MICHAEL PAJON
Roll Again!, There is Blood Upon the Serpent's Road, 2015
mixed media collage on antique book covers
33 x 17 inches

 

 

Game boards and gaming interest me greatly as a tool for socialization but also as a reflection of life.  Board games are central in building communication skills with your peers as a child, but often come with a strict set of rules.  Everyone ends up with their own way about handling the rules, they create house rules as an interpretation of the games actual rules to encourage more casual play, others treat the rules in a much more strict manner. In life however, though there are countless rules as we often find in casual gaming experiences someone always cheats.  The playing field is almost often never flat, but a serpentine road that can be at times treacherous to navigate.  Along the Serpent’s Road things may appear tempting at times, glossy signage paving each space from the tail to the head offering one any number of things.  Along the way a host of characters and game pieces lost, astray, indifferent, and embittered.  Some naively cling to the role of the dice they are given instead of making an attempt to skip ahead.  They pass once fertile environments being carved up, sold off, mined, pumped and harvested.  The noise along the road becomes deafening, making it hard for our players to hear the warnings and read the signs that may lead them astray or take them to victory.

ANASTASIA PELIAS
Janis, 2016
oil stick on Arches paper
60.5 x 52 inches

ANASTASIA PELIAS
Amy, 2016
oil stick on Arches paper
61.5 x 51.5 inches

NIKKI ROSATO
Untitled (Merged), 2015
hand cut road map
62 x 62 inches

NIKKI ROSATO
Untitled (Self Portrait), 2013
hand cut road map
16 x 16 x 14 inches

PETER SARKISIAN
Book (Version 2) #6, 2015
found book, powder-coated steel and aluminum, video projection
13 x 10 x 20 inches

In "Book", a small man is seen crawling about while rewriting a dictionary, symbolizing the ongoing and sometimes sloppy evolution of language in the modern age. The figure whistles “Ninety nine bottles of beer on the wall”, while scribbling misspelled words, SMS chat abbreviations and poorly written notes across the pages of the book.

 

ROSEMARY SCOTT-FISHBURN
I Thought I Heard My Name (For Elisa) [side view], 2016
acrylic and polyester dimensional photograph
17 x 22 x 5 inches

ROSEMARY SCOTT-FISHBURN
All of this and More, 2016
acrylic and polyester dimensional photograph
10 x 10 x 10 inches

ROSEMARY SCOTT-FISHBURN
All of this and More [side view], 2016
acrylic and polyester dimensional photograph
10 x 10 x 10 inches

PAUL VILLINSKI
Legacy VI, 2016
antique carved wood and plaster frame, aluminum (found cans), wire, steel, gold leaf
20.5 x 22.5 inches

PAUL VILLINSKI
Legacy VI [detail], 2016
antique carved wood and plaster frame, aluminum (found cans), wire, steel, gold leaf
20.5 x 22.5 inches

PAUL VILLINSKI

Vector [right], 2015

found aluminum cans, wire, Flashe

84 x 60 x 6 inches

MONICA ZERINGUE
From Silver and Dream, 2015
graphite on linen
31.75 x 23.75 inches

MONICA ZERINGUE
And yet I cannot go, 2015
graphite and beads on linen
13.75 x 13.75 inches

MONICA ZERINGUE

Moon of Other Days, 2013

graphite and hand-sewn beads on primed linen

13.5 x 13.5 inches

MONICA ZERINGUE
Under her dark veil, 2015
graphite, embroidered thread and beads on linen
13.75 x 13.75 inches