Biography

[New Orleans, LA ::: b.1981]

A native of New Orleans, LA, KATRINA ANDRY received an MFA in Printmaking from Louisiana State University, Baton Rouge, LA in 2010. She currently works and lives in New Orleans where she maintains a studio in her home.

Andry’s work explores the negative effect stereotypes have on people of color. Where stereotypes are typically used to help us normalize our surroundings by categorizing groups of people, the byproduct of stereotypes is that they also create arbitrary differences between people. Stereotyping establishes an arbitrary set of societal norms/rules that benefit the majority while it disenfranchises other groups of people. Andry’s work challenges stereotypes placed upon people of color (the Other), which once had scientific research qualifying them, and how these ideas or stereotypes have become a part of how we see each other, whether consciously or unconsciously. In her practice, Andry often creates large scale (4’ or greater), color reduction wood cuts portraying white men in black face, or more recently, watermelon face acting out a stereotype that is most often placed upon people of color. Andry specifically uses white men as they are typically seen as figures of authority, and are historically the perpetuators of stereotypes against people of color (though people of color often enforce these same stereotypes in their own communities, but it’s not as pervasive, as people of color are more self-aware of these actions most often). Andry also uses non-people-of-color in her work so the prints aren’t misperceived as being an expression of black culture. The fact that they are sometimes seen as that, speaks to the truth of how well engrained stereotypes against people of color are in our culture.

Katrina Andry was listed in the January-February 2012 issue of Art in Print as one of the top 50 printmakers. In 2015, her work was featured in the Editor’s Selection of the June/July South edition of New American Paintings 118. She is currently being represented by Jonathan Ferrara Gallery in New Orleans, and is also an active member of the Staple Goods Collective in the St. Roch neighborhood of New Orleans. She has also been awarded residencies from the Joan Mitchell Center of New Orleans, Anchor Graphics in Chicago, and Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, CA.

Her work is in numerous collections including C.C.H. Pounder, Stella Jones Gallery Collection, The Saratoga Collection, Drive By Press Permanent Collection, Dirty Printmakers of America State to State Relief Portfolio, Ladies of the Letterpress Old Maid Card Exchange, and Bridges Portfolio Exchange. 


STATEMENT |||
Stereotypes are well ingrained into our Western culture, and are used almost instinctively in order to deal with our differences. Though, the byproduct of stereotypes is that they also create differences between people, and stereotyping establishes an arbitrary set of societal norms/rules that benefit the majority while it disenfranchises other groups of   people. An example of this would be having a mullet. Having a mullet may be socially acceptable in your subculture, but is widely viewed as a stamp of ignorance and a red neck mentality on part of the person sporting the mullet. Therefore, not having a mullet makes you smart and having a mullet makes you ignorant, though hairstyle [scientifically] has nothing to do with levels of cognizance. My work challenges ideas about black people (Other) that once ago had scientific research qualifying them, and how these ideas or stereotypes have become a part of how we see each other whether consciously or unconsciously.

Stereotypes are reiterated in our culture on a daily basis by the Media in all forms, and it’s hard to deny that the source of your information has a lot to do with how you perceive the world around you. The media plays a heavy role in the propagation, perpetuation and continuation of stereotypes in our society.

In my work I deal with with the historical aspect of stereotypes perpetuated against black people: how did they come to be, what are they based on, and in what way is it harmful to black people in America? I put white males in black face acting out what people generally perceive to be stereotypes of black culture. I use white males because they are seen as figures of authority. By putting white males in black face I let the audience know that the piece is about perception and not reality, and that is how the West perceives the Other. 

CURRICULUM VITAE |||

[download full CV below]

EDUCATION
2010   MFA in Printmaking, Louisiana State University
2004   BFA in Graphic Design, Louisiana State University

SELECTED COLLECTIONS
C.C.H. Pounder
Stella Jones Gallery Collection
The Saratoga Collection
Drive By Press Permanent Collection
Dirty Printmakers of America State to State Relief Portfolio
Ladies of the Letterpress Old Maid Card Exchange
Bridges Portfolio Exchange

RESIDENCIES
Joan Mitchell Center, 2013-2014
Visual Artists Network (VAN) in New Orleans, 2013
Anchor Graphics at Columbia College in Chicago, 2011
Kala Art Institute in Berkeley, California, 2010
Xavier University in New Orleans, Louisiana (ongoing residency), 2010

SELECTED SOLO EXHIBITIONS
2015   Initiating Cause and Effect, Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans, LA
          Indecent Intentions Leave Me Vulnerable and Voiceless, Staple Goods, New Orleans, LA
2014   Together We Stare Out From the Shadows; Hiding From Their Prejudiced Stares,
          Isaac Delgado Fine Arts Gallery, New Orleans, LA
2012   Otherness and American Values, Staple Goods, New Orleans, LA

SELECTED GROUP EXHIBITIONS
2014-15   Guns in the Hands of Artists, Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, New Orleans, LA
2013   Visual Artist Network (VAN) Annual Show, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA
          Shape of Place, Staple Goods, New Orleans, LA
2012   Geographica, DuMois Gallery, New Orleans, LA
          Nola Now, Contemporary Arts Center, New Orleans, LA
          Heavy Hitters, Peveto Gallery, Houston, TX
2011   Instructions - Call and Response, Antenna Gallery, New Orleans, LA
          Mahalia Jackson Tribute, Stella Jones Gallery, New Orleans, LA
          What We Can Do, Antenna Gallery, New Orleans, LA
          Black Art Now, M Francis Gallery, New Orleans, LA
2010   Emerge, Ogden Museum, New Orleans, LA
          Here and Now, Bricks and Bombs Gallery, Baton Rouge, LA
          12th Annual Venus Envy, Baton Rouge Gallery, Baton Rouge, L


VIEW PRESS DOSSIER