21st Annual NO DEAD ARTISTS

International Juried Exhibtion of Contemporary Art

August 30 - September 30, 2017

First Saturday Gallery Openings ||| 2 September, 6-9PM

TONY DAGRADI
Pioneer Woman, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
8.75 x 6.5 x 1 inches
 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
If I Only Had a Brain, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
9.5 x 7.25 x 1 inches
 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Pure Food Laws, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
11 x 12.5 x 6.5 inches

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Pure Food Laws (side B), 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
11 x 12.5 x 6.5 inches

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
The Wild Ones , 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish, triptych
9.5 x 20.5 x1.25 inches

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Atlas #2, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
14.5 x 10.5 x 1.5 inches

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Winged Victory, 2017
hardcover book & acrylic lacquer
9 x 6.5 x .75 inches
 

Winged Victory is derived from a single volume of a vintage edition of 'The Wonderland Of Knowledge - The Pictorial Encyclopedia'

 

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Comparative Anatomy, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic lacquer
8.5 x 5.75 x 1 inches

 

This piece was realized from a vintage text entitled 'The History Of Comparative Anatomy'.

 

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
20th Century Typewriting, 2017
hardcover book, acrylic lacquer
10.75 x 8 x .5 inches

 

'20th Century Typewriting' was created from a vintage manual of the same name.

 

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
National Parks, 2016
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
11 x 9.5 x 1.25 inches
 

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Gray's Anatomy, 2016
hardcover book, acrylic lacquer
10.5 x 11 x 5.75 inches
 

This piece was created from the widely used technical manual of anatomy.

 

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
Gray's Anatomy (side B), 2016
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
10.5 x 11 x 6 inches

 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

TONY DAGRADI
International Technology (diptych), 2016
hardcover book, acrylic varnish
9 x 14 x 1.25 inches
 

BIO

TONY DAGRADI is an internationally recognized jazz performer, artist, composer, author and educator.

For over three decades he has made his home in New Orleans, performing on tenor and soprano saxophone with many of the Crescent City's most celebrated artists, including Ellis Marsalis, Allen Toussaint, Professor Longhair, James Booker, The Meters, Dr. John, James Black, Johnny Adams and Gatemouth Brown. His performing past also includes five years as a member of the internationally acclaimed Carla Bley Band and appearances and recordings with Bobby McFerrin, Mose Allison and Nat Adderley.

Dagradi is most well known for his work with Astral Project, an adventurous quintet made up of top New Orleans players dedicated to playing cutting-edge improvisational music. In addition, for over twenty five years, he has been a Professor of Saxophone and Jazz Studies at Loyola University in New Orleans.

Since 2015, Dagradi has been exploring the compelling visual possibilities of altered books. Choosing vintage and antiquarian texts, he carefully cuts through one page at a time to reveal existing images in a three dimensional collage or sculpture. The results allow the contents and imagery of long outdated material to be viewed in a manner that is both exciting and thought provoking. 

 

ARTIST STATEMENT:

As I begin a piece, I examine each book to get a feel for the content and, to a lesser degree, the placement of that content. Moving forward, I have several stategies which will allow me to expose images, ultimately bringing them together in a unifified composition.

In my first method of choice, I seal the edges of the book and begin cutting page by page, removing everything but the images that appeal to me. This can be very exciting as I never know what will appear next or how it will compliment the piece as a whole. In my mind, it is very similar to improvising with a jazz ensemble. Inevitably, during every performance each player interjects his or her own commentary. No two performances are ever the same and everyone must react to what is happening at the moment. Similary, as I cut through the pages of a book, I must react to whatever appears, choosing to keep or reject what presents itself. If continued to it's logical conclusion, all of the material is exactly where it has always been, but now can be viewed in a totally different way.

Another approach I take is selecting images from a book and placing them as I please to more finely control the composition. From a viewer's point of view, the end result is almost identical to that of the pure excavation process. Most of the pieces in my "Jazz" series and "Fantasy" series are assembled in this manner.

When a piece is completed, I coat exposed surface with an acrylic lacquer. This treatment adds a certain rigidity to the paper sculpture and serves to protect it from air and dust.

JENNIFER DAY
Make it Greener, 2017
acrylic, ink, colored pencil, collage and enamel on canvas
52 x 74 inches

 

BIO

Jenny Day (b.1981) is a painter who divides her time between Tucson, Arizona and Santa Fe, New Mexico. She earned an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Arizona, a BFA in Painting from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BA in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. Her national and international exhibition record most recently includes the Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Korea, Elmhurst Museum in Chicago, IL, Crocker Museum in Sacramento, CA, Florida State University Museum in Tallahassee, FL and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, in New Orleans, LA.  Day's work has been supported by a Contemporary Forum Artist Grant from the Phoenix Art Museum in 2017, a Barron Purchase Award in 2016 and through participation at the Ucross Foundation, the Jentel Foundation, Playa Foundation For The Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Art Center, and the Armory Art Center. 

 

STATEMENT 

I walked in the Mohave desert.  Listened to the bees as they hummed and sucked from yellow creosote flowers.  I watched the desert blur by as I drove eighty-miles per hour on I-40.  I couldn’t hear the bees.  The Mohave backdropped a science-fiction film I watched from my couch, the familiar recast as alien.  I dreamt the desert, distorted, California pushed up against Florida, the swamp pouring in.  I pulled up photos on my phone.  Digital, long strings of binary, framed and backlit on the little screen, compiled with other places.

Which Mohave am I remembering?

The paintings acknowledge a distancing.  The built environment as landscape, the landscape as construct, the whole of the construct shattered by a fragmentation.  A scattering of attention.  The ruins of human intentions sunlit and wholly glorious in their decay.  Abandoned or half-abandoned and remembered and recorded and replicated and distorted each step of the way.

The body of work skips like the dream.  Fairbanks, Alaska blurs into California Superfund sites.  Historical buildings I’ve walked through mate with Instagram photos.  Hybridized places emerge, white space mimics the frames of our tiny machines.  Pencil marks left in, masking tape, signal the painting as object, mediated, layers away from representation.

The paintings are created in longing, possibly mourning.  Imagining an innocence of vision that might never have existed, rejecting it, recognizing the impossibility of an unaltered connection to place.  The places are there still.  

JENNIFER DAY
Dust Storm Halo, 2017
acrylic, ink, colored pencil, collage and enamel on canvas
24 x 24 inches

 

BIO

Jenny Day (b.1981) is a painter who divides her time between Tucson, Arizona and Santa Fe, New Mexico. She earned an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Arizona, a BFA in Painting from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BA in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. Her national and international exhibition record most recently includes the Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Korea, Elmhurst Museum in Chicago, IL, Crocker Museum in Sacramento, CA, Florida State University Museum in Tallahassee, FL and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, in New Orleans, LA.  Day's work has been supported by a Contemporary Forum Artist Grant from the Phoenix Art Museum in 2017, a Barron Purchase Award in 2016 and through participation at the Ucross Foundation, the Jentel Foundation, Playa Foundation For The Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Art Center, and the Armory Art Center. 

 

STATEMENT 

I walked in the Mohave desert.  Listened to the bees as they hummed and sucked from yellow creosote flowers.  I watched the desert blur by as I drove eighty-miles per hour on I-40.  I couldn’t hear the bees.  The Mohave backdropped a science-fiction film I watched from my couch, the familiar recast as alien.  I dreamt the desert, distorted, California pushed up against Florida, the swamp pouring in.  I pulled up photos on my phone.  Digital, long strings of binary, framed and backlit on the little screen, compiled with other places.

Which Mohave am I remembering?

The paintings acknowledge a distancing.  The built environment as landscape, the landscape as construct, the whole of the construct shattered by a fragmentation.  A scattering of attention.  The ruins of human intentions sunlit and wholly glorious in their decay.  Abandoned or half-abandoned and remembered and recorded and replicated and distorted each step of the way.

The body of work skips like the dream.  Fairbanks, Alaska blurs into California Superfund sites.  Historical buildings I’ve walked through mate with Instagram photos.  Hybridized places emerge, white space mimics the frames of our tiny machines.  Pencil marks left in, masking tape, signal the painting as object, mediated, layers away from representation.

The paintings are created in longing, possibly mourning.  Imagining an innocence of vision that might never have existed, rejecting it, recognizing the impossibility of an unaltered connection to place.  The places are there still.  

JENNIFER DAY
P4011, 2017
acrylic, pencil, ink, paint pen, enamel, graphite and collage on panel
24 x 20 inches

 

BIO

Jenny Day (b.1981) is a painter who divides her time between Tucson, Arizona and Santa Fe, New Mexico. She earned an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Arizona, a BFA in Painting from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BA in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. Her national and international exhibition record most recently includes the Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Korea, Elmhurst Museum in Chicago, IL, Crocker Museum in Sacramento, CA, Florida State University Museum in Tallahassee, FL and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, in New Orleans, LA.  Day's work has been supported by a Contemporary Forum Artist Grant from the Phoenix Art Museum in 2017, a Barron Purchase Award in 2016 and through participation at the Ucross Foundation, the Jentel Foundation, Playa Foundation For The Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Art Center, and the Armory Art Center. 

 

STATEMENT 

I walked in the Mohave desert.  Listened to the bees as they hummed and sucked from yellow creosote flowers.  I watched the desert blur by as I drove eighty-miles per hour on I-40.  I couldn’t hear the bees.  The Mohave backdropped a science-fiction film I watched from my couch, the familiar recast as alien.  I dreamt the desert, distorted, California pushed up against Florida, the swamp pouring in.  I pulled up photos on my phone.  Digital, long strings of binary, framed and backlit on the little screen, compiled with other places.

Which Mohave am I remembering?

The paintings acknowledge a distancing.  The built environment as landscape, the landscape as construct, the whole of the construct shattered by a fragmentation.  A scattering of attention.  The ruins of human intentions sunlit and wholly glorious in their decay.  Abandoned or half-abandoned and remembered and recorded and replicated and distorted each step of the way.

The body of work skips like the dream.  Fairbanks, Alaska blurs into California Superfund sites.  Historical buildings I’ve walked through mate with Instagram photos.  Hybridized places emerge, white space mimics the frames of our tiny machines.  Pencil marks left in, masking tape, signal the painting as object, mediated, layers away from representation.

The paintings are created in longing, possibly mourning.  Imagining an innocence of vision that might never have existed, rejecting it, recognizing the impossibility of an unaltered connection to place.  The places are there still.  

JENNIFER DAY
A Distancing, 2017
acrylic, pencil, ink, paint pen, enamel, graphite and collage on panel
36 x 24 inches 

 

BIO

Jenny Day (b.1981) is a painter who divides her time between Tucson, Arizona and Santa Fe, New Mexico. She earned an MFA in Painting and Drawing from the University of Arizona, a BFA in Painting from the University of Alaska Fairbanks and a BA in Environmental Studies from the University of California Santa Cruz. Her national and international exhibition record most recently includes the Czong Institute for Contemporary Art in Korea, Elmhurst Museum in Chicago, IL, Crocker Museum in Sacramento, CA, Florida State University Museum in Tallahassee, FL and Jonathan Ferrara Gallery, in New Orleans, LA.  Day's work has been supported by a Contemporary Forum Artist Grant from the Phoenix Art Museum in 2017, a Barron Purchase Award in 2016 and through participation at the Ucross Foundation, the Jentel Foundation, Playa Foundation For The Arts, Kimmel Harding Nelson Art Center, and the Armory Art Center. 

 

STATEMENT 

I walked in the Mohave desert.  Listened to the bees as they hummed and sucked from yellow creosote flowers.  I watched the desert blur by as I drove eighty-miles per hour on I-40.  I couldn’t hear the bees.  The Mohave backdropped a science-fiction film I watched from my couch, the familiar recast as alien.  I dreamt the desert, distorted, California pushed up against Florida, the swamp pouring in.  I pulled up photos on my phone.  Digital, long strings of binary, framed and backlit on the little screen, compiled with other places.

Which Mohave am I remembering?

The paintings acknowledge a distancing.  The built environment as landscape, the landscape as construct, the whole of the construct shattered by a fragmentation.  A scattering of attention.  The ruins of human intentions sunlit and wholly glorious in their decay.  Abandoned or half-abandoned and remembered and recorded and replicated and distorted each step of the way.

The body of work skips like the dream.  Fairbanks, Alaska blurs into California Superfund sites.  Historical buildings I’ve walked through mate with Instagram photos.  Hybridized places emerge, white space mimics the frames of our tiny machines.  Pencil marks left in, masking tape, signal the painting as object, mediated, layers away from representation.

The paintings are created in longing, possibly mourning.  Imagining an innocence of vision that might never have existed, rejecting it, recognizing the impossibility of an unaltered connection to place.  The places are there still.  

NELMARIE DU PREEZ
To Activate, 2016
video installation
Edition 1 of 3
 

Du Preez and her technological other re-imagine Semiotics of the Kitchen (1975) by Martha Rosler, that questions the bizarre relationship between woman and the kitchen. du Preez's 'kitchen’ however is filled with electronic household tools activated through voice recognition. In an increasingly automated world, du Preez seeks to examine such changes in public and private spaces in relation to gendered bodies.

 

STATEMENT


As a South African artist split between London and Pretoria, I perform multiple roles as computer programmer, videographer, composer and performance artist. My art practice mainly serves as a means to ponder, transform and satisfy my own socio-political anxieties. Here Art and Science allow me to uncover the causes and symptoms of my somewhat schizophrenic concerns. Through the use of masquerade, mimicry and humour I navigate my entrapment within the post-human and postcolonial conditions with an emphasis on the fragility of relation and ultimately the politics and value of trust. I expand this fascination with trust through multiple collaborative projects including FLAT 34 and wasis.today, both of which aim to challenge the 'universalised mirage' of aesthetics.
 

NELMARIE DU PREEZ
To Shoot, 2016
video installation
Edition 1 of 3
 

Du Preez collaborates with a drown-camera to re-interpret the work of artist Chris Burden whom famously had himself shot in the arm by his studio-mate. The drone, a politically and socially contestable device, presents a contemporary alternative for the violence of a gun and how various technological advancements influence our understanding of surveillance and violence.

 

STATEMENT


As a South African artist split between London and Pretoria, I perform multiple roles as computer programmer, videographer, composer and performance artist. My art practice mainly serves as a means to ponder, transform and satisfy my own socio-political anxieties. Here Art and Science allow me to uncover the causes and symptoms of my somewhat schizophrenic concerns. Through the use of masquerade, mimicry and humour I navigate my entrapment within the post-human and postcolonial conditions with an emphasis on the fragility of relation and ultimately the politics and value of trust. I expand this fascination with trust through multiple collaborative projects including FLAT 34 and wasis.today, both of which aim to challenge the 'universalised mirage' of aesthetics.

NELMARIE DU PREEZ
To Stab, 2013
video installation
Edition 3 of 3

 

Du Preez collaborates with a robot to re-enact Marina Abramovic's, Rhythm 10 (1973) where Abrmovic plays the 'knife game' stabbing several knives continuously between her fingers onto a surface. Du Preez here instead performs with a piece of technology as an equal actor. The encounters and collisions between these two 'bodies' are presented, showcasing the fragility of relation. 

 

STATEMENT


As a South African artist split between London and Pretoria, I perform multiple roles as computer programmer, videographer, composer and performance artist. My art practice mainly serves as a means to ponder, transform and satisfy my own socio-political anxieties. Here Art and Science allow me to uncover the causes and symptoms of my somewhat schizophrenic concerns. Through the use of masquerade, mimicry and humour I navigate my entrapment within the post-human and postcolonial conditions with an emphasis on the fragility of relation and ultimately the politics and value of trust. I expand this fascination with trust through multiple collaborative projects including FLAT 34 and wasis.today, both of which aim to challenge the 'universalised mirage' of aesthetics.

NELMARIE DU PREEZ
To Hit, 2013
video installation
Edition 3 of 3
 

Du Preez and her digital other re-interpret Light/Dark (1977) by Marina Abramovic and Ulay, who slapped each other continuously. Du Preez slaps her digital other who in turn is able to slap Du Preez back via electrical impulses calculated in relation to how hard Du Preez slaps the screen. Du Preez uses computer technologies to understand the relationship between our virtual and physical selves. 

 

STATEMENT


As a South African artist split between London and Pretoria, I perform multiple roles as computer programmer, videographer, composer and performance artist. My art practice mainly serves as a means to ponder, transform and satisfy my own socio-political anxieties. Here Art and Science allow me to uncover the causes and symptoms of my somewhat schizophrenic concerns. Through the use of masquerade, mimicry and humour I navigate my entrapment within the post-human and postcolonial conditions with an emphasis on the fragility of relation and ultimately the politics and value of trust. I expand this fascination with trust through multiple collaborative projects including FLAT 34 and wasis.today, both of which aim to challenge the 'universalised mirage' of aesthetics.

NELMARIE DU PREEZ
To Shout, 2013
video installation
Edition 3 of 3

 

Du Preez and her digital other re-interpret the work of Marina Abramovic and Ulay entitled AAA-AAA (1978) wherein they sit across from each other and proceed to shout at each other. Through algorithms the digital other is activated and distorted – an other that might be considered as a product of social media.

 

STATEMENT


As a South African artist split between London and Pretoria, I perform multiple roles as computer programmer, videographer, composer and performance artist. My art practice mainly serves as a means to ponder, transform and satisfy my own socio-political anxieties. Here Art and Science allow me to uncover the causes and symptoms of my somewhat schizophrenic concerns. Through the use of masquerade, mimicry and humour I navigate my entrapment within the post-human and postcolonial conditions with an emphasis on the fragility of relation and ultimately the politics and value of trust. I expand this fascination with trust through multiple collaborative projects including FLAT 34 and wasis.today, both of which aim to challenge the 'universalised mirage' of aesthetics.

IVY GUILD
Pillow Talk, 2016
bed frame, white poly pillows, assorted fabric, polyfil, precoated cotton with 120 film images
Sizes Variable: 72 x 48 x 36 inches (6ft x 4ft x 3ft)

 

Hand-sewn pillow cases were quilted and printed with hand-carved wood blocks, and piled with machine-sewn photographic cotton plush men. 

 

STATEMENT

Stitched works that blend photography, sewing, quilting, embroidery, and printmaking are the most current iteration of my practice as an artist. My work is formed through splicing, shifting forms, forging bonds, tying knots, and piecing that which is subtle, overlooked, or impermanent into that which is texturized, relatable, tangible, and recorded. The impermanent might be a Facebook trending status, an uttered microaggression, a backhanded compliment, or a brief encounter with another person. 

The digital is one of the least permanent objects, yet the most permanent. A digital image can be frozen, recorded, screenshot, printed, shared, and more. Once these files, works, or images have had their moment in the spotlight, they often fall into the recesses of our memories, hard drives, and thoughts. 

A stitched work is a physical object that cannot be deleted by a couple clicks. Fabric is woven to hold strong and last throughout its lifetime. A stitched work is a traditional form for honoring, remembering, and making that which is fleeting, last many lifetimes. Nonetheless, objects made from textiles and woven materials do not withstand the weight of time. Thus presenting the complicated relationship between permanence and impermanence that I seek to develop in my traditionally informed, contemporary works. 

IVY GUILD
Trophies, Prizes & Dime Pieces, 2017
120 film prints on precoated cotton, fiber fill, pink satin, and thread
Sizes Variable - approx. 60 x 60 inches

 

Hand-sewn dolls

 

 

STATEMENT

Stitched works that blend photography, sewing, quilting, embroidery, and printmaking are the most current iteration of my practice as an artist. My work is formed through splicing, shifting forms, forging bonds, tying knots, and piecing that which is subtle, overlooked, or impermanent into that which is texturized, relatable, tangible, and recorded. The impermanent might be a Facebook trending status, an uttered microaggression, a backhanded compliment, or a brief encounter with another person. 

The digital is one of the least permanent objects, yet the most permanent. A digital image can be frozen, recorded, screenshot, printed, shared, and more. Once these files, works, or images have had their moment in the spotlight, they often fall into the recesses of our memories, hard drives, and thoughts. 

A stitched work is a physical object that cannot be deleted by a couple clicks. Fabric is woven to hold strong and last throughout its lifetime. A stitched work is a traditional form for honoring, remembering, and making that which is fleeting, last many lifetimes. Nonetheless, objects made from textiles and woven materials do not withstand the weight of time. Thus presenting the complicated relationship between permanence and impermanence that I seek to develop in my traditionally informed, contemporary works. 

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 73, 2017
digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."
 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 68, 2017
digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."

 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 67, 2017
digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."


About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 66, 2017
digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."

 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 64, 2016
linen, canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches
 

Digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas

 

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."

 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 63, 2016
linen canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

Digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas

 

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."

 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

MARILYN HENRION
Patchwork City 62, 2016
linen, canvas
24 x 48 x 1 inches

 

Digitally manipulated photography, pigment printing on linen, collage on stretched canvas

 

 

STATEMENT 


From her earlier abstract works, Henrion’s creative output has always been deeply rooted in the urban geometry of her surroundings as a life-long New Yorker. In 2010, with the introduction of her Soft City series, those origins became explicit in mixed media works based on digitally manipulated photographic images of her Soho neighborhood. In her Windows series, the artist’s eye expands to include other cities and towns in which she has traveled, focusing on the symbolism of the window. Much as Edward Hopper had done in the last century, Henrion synthesizes and transforms the 'facts' of the material world to reflect her own experience of a particular place. In her collage works, Henrion "once again turns to abstraction, drawing upon her own photographic images to capture the energy and vitality of the ever-changing urban landscape."

 

About her work, art critic Ed McCormack writes: “This major American artist is one of precious few who have taken the textile medium far beyond its brief popularity during the feminist era and continued to broaden its possibilities and elevate it to the highest level of contemporary mainstream aesthetics.”

RICHARD HRICKO
Wunderkammer, 2017
woodblock on Kitakata
48 x 24 inches 

 

Wunderkammer is a digitally manipulated image from a scan of collected materials. It was lasercut onto wood before being transferred onto kitakata paper using traditional methods of hand printing on an etching press.

 

STATEMENT 


My studio work draws upon the observation, invention and integration of details from natural and built environments. I compose each image by synthesizing a medley of disparate visual qualities and material characteristics (natural phenomena and materials, artifacts and architecture). Intricate, subtle rendering and subdued light serve to enhance an atmospheric sense of quiet mystery. A unique, believable image that never wholly existed in nature emerges from this variety of sources, suggesting the passage of time and the tension between mechanically constructed and naturally created forms.
 

RICHARD HRICKO
Thaw III, 2017
woodblock on Kitakata
48 x 24 inches

 

 

Thaw III is a digitally manipulated image from a scan of collected materials. It was lasercut onto wood before being transferred onto kitakata paper using traditional methods of hand printing on an etching press.

 

STATEMENT 


My studio work draws upon the observation, invention and integration of details from natural and built environments. I compose each image by synthesizing a medley of disparate visual qualities and material characteristics (natural phenomena and materials, artifacts and architecture). Intricate, subtle rendering and subdued light serve to enhance an atmospheric sense of quiet mystery. A unique, believable image that never wholly existed in nature emerges from this variety of sources, suggesting the passage of time and the tension between mechanically constructed and naturally created forms.

RICHARD HRICKO
Growth VII, 2017
woodblock on Kitakata
48 x 24 inches

 

Growth VIII is a digitally manipulated image from a scan of collected materials. It was lasercut onto wood before being transferred onto kitakata paper using traditional methods of hand printing on an etching press.

 

STATEMENT 


My studio work draws upon the observation, invention and integration of details from natural and built environments. I compose each image by synthesizing a medley of disparate visual qualities and material characteristics (natural phenomena and materials, artifacts and architecture). Intricate, subtle rendering and subdued light serve to enhance an atmospheric sense of quiet mystery. A unique, believable image that never wholly existed in nature emerges from this variety of sources, suggesting the passage of time and the tension between mechanically constructed and naturally created forms.

YEHRIM LEE
Shopping Spree, 2017
print on acetate film, Terra Cotta, Pyrometric Cone glaze, 04Glaze, yarn, wire, layer cut paper
135 x 125 x 160 inches

Mixed material and ceramics give form to my conceptual interests. Acrylic film is digitally printed with patterns and layered with colors that make me feel the heat of wanting to pursue something. Commercial desire, shopping sprees, I know these well. I am a spontaneous buyer. . I choose clay, glazes and create surfaces that reflect this intuitive process. I fire and refire to excess.

 

STATEMENT

 
My mother made ceramic work while I was in her womb. My father is an Onggi potter and I learned from him how hard the artist's life of labor can be. From my upbringing in Korea and my later ceramic studies in Jingdezhen, China, I have acquired a sense of collectivism. This accumulation of East Asian culture, tradition, and history intermingled with an American sense of individualism when I began to live and work internationally. My works are hybrids, acculturating bridges that I build between diverse cultures. My forms have transformed into representations of my current self. With my glazes and complex forms, I explore appetite and gluttony. These flower and cake landscapes open and flow with icing and snow. They explore dichotomies of masculine with feminine, East with West, decorative with functional, and structure with fragility, allowing these opposites to blend and intertwine. Through clay and glaze, I explore dynamic, complex, fragmented, integrated, and internal reflections of myself and my culture. My works invite audiences to enjoy interacting with the pieces in and through the space in which they are displayed. Viewers do not need to know about my background in order to appreciate my work ? I just want them to spend time with my pieces and bring their own imaginations to their experience with the work. I hope that in viewing my work, the viewers? languages and cultural memories will blend together with moments of empathy, channeling though mind and soul, evoking crosscontinental 
conversation. Mixed materials and ceramics give form to my conceptual interests. I digitally print acrylic film with patterns and layers of colors that make me feel the heat of wanting to pursue something. I am a spontaneous buyer: commercial desire, shopping sprees, I know these well. I choose clay and glazes and create surfaces that reflect this intuitive process. I fire and refire to excess, only stopping when the material starts to crack or move too much. These multiple firings offer changes in vibrancy: from 'too muchness' pink to sweet sweaty blues, from icing yellow to greedy green. Through colors and glaze I explore luxury and decadence. I make patterns in Photoshop before experimenting with glazes and firing, so my surfaces crystallize, facet, fragment, stylize, sharpen, distort, blur and cause noise. My touch is a documentation of my expression. I try to not hesitate. I work towards a process that is believable to me. Fast, intuitive, confident, powerful: these are the kinds of movements that I try to embody. My forms reflect the complexity of modern life. These complexities cause fusion amongst one another, like the accumulation (and sometimes confusion) of my cultural identity. Fiber provides a sculptural integrity for hanging, weaving, and connecting components together. For me, fabric is decoration-pattern and represents my interest in fashion. Fashion responds to nature, and I respond to that culture of fashion: Alexander McQueen, Marni, Chanel. These designers inspire me with their boldness, complexity, excessive ornamentation, and use of drama. In my Alfred experience I had opportunity to confront frugality and austerity, in contrast to the excessive lifestyle of my past. Through the work I try to find myself. When I am alone in the studio, I feel strongly connected to what my father said about what is truly satisfying in life. Through my forms, I repeat movements of labor. For me this is a meditative way of making. Making the work satisfies me more than anything else. Like my father, I am going together with my work, through life. Work is not the goal of my life, it is meaningful movement that I pursue.

YEHRIM LEE
Shopping Spree (detail), 2017
print on acetate film, Terra Cotta, Pyrometric Cone glaze, 04Glaze, yarn, wire, layer cut paper
135 x 125 x 160 inches

Mixed material and ceramics give form to my conceptual interests. Acrylic film is digitally printed with patterns and layered with colors that make me feel the heat of wanting to pursue something. Commercial desire, shopping sprees, I know these well. I am a spontaneous buyer. . I choose clay, glazes and create surfaces that reflect this intuitive process. I fire and refire to excess.

 

 

STATEMENT

 
My mother made ceramic work while I was in her womb. My father is an Onggi potter and I learned from him how hard the artist's life of labor can be. From my upbringing in Korea and my later ceramic studies in Jingdezhen, China, I have acquired a sense of collectivism. This accumulation of East Asian culture, tradition, and history intermingled with an American sense of individualism when I began to live and work internationally. My works are hybrids, acculturating bridges that I build between diverse cultures. My forms have transformed into representations of my current self. With my glazes and complex forms, I explore appetite and gluttony. These flower and cake landscapes open and flow with icing and snow. They explore dichotomies of masculine with feminine, East with West, decorative with functional, and structure with fragility, allowing these opposites to blend and intertwine. Through clay and glaze, I explore dynamic, complex, fragmented, integrated, and internal reflections of myself and my culture. My works invite audiences to enjoy interacting with the pieces in and through the space in which they are displayed. Viewers do not need to know about my background in order to appreciate my work ' I just want them to spend time with my pieces and bring their own imaginations to their experience with the work. I hope that in viewing my work, the viewers' languages and cultural memories will blend together with moments of empathy, channeling though mind and soul, evoking crosscontinental 
conversation. Mixed materials and ceramics give form to my conceptual interests. I digitally print acrylic film with patterns and layers of colors that make me feel the heat of wanting to pursue something. I am a spontaneous buyer: commercial desire, shopping sprees, I know these well. I choose clay and glazes and create surfaces that reflect this intuitive process. I fire and refire to excess, only stopping when the material starts to crack or move too much. These multiple firings offer changes in vibrancy: from 'too muchness' pink to sweet sweaty blues, from icing yellow to greedy green. Through colors and glaze I explore luxury and decadence. I make patterns in Photoshop before experimenting with glazes and firing, so my surfaces crystallize, facet, fragment, stylize, sharpen, distort, blur and cause noise. My touch is a documentation of my expression. I try to not hesitate. I work towards a process that is believable to me. Fast, intuitive, confident, powerful: these are the kinds of movements that I try to embody. My forms reflect the complexity of modern life. These complexities cause fusion amongst one another, like the accumulation (and sometimes confusion) of my cultural identity. Fiber provides a sculptural integrity for hanging, weaving, and connecting components together. For me, fabric is decoration-pattern and represents my interest in fashion. Fashion responds to nature, and I respond to that culture of fashion: Alexander McQueen, Marni, Chanel. These designers inspire me with their boldness, complexity, excessive ornamentation, and use of drama. In my Alfred experience I had opportunity to confront frugality and austerity, in contrast to the excessive lifestyle of my past. Through the work I try to find myself. When I am alone in the studio, I feel strongly connected to what my father said about what is truly satisfying in life. Through my forms, I repeat movements of labor. For me this is a meditative way of making. Making the work satisfies me more than anything else. Like my father, I am going together with my work, through life. Work is not the goal of my life, it is meaningful movement that I pursue.

MARET POLZINE
Thursday's Child, 2017
Video installation
Running time: 6:46
Edition 1 of 10

 

STATEMENT

Living inside your body is neither easy nor passive; it is similarly difficult to understand the ways in which others live in their bodies. The knowledge we have about our own identities, and the identities of others, often comes to us in the form of intuitive sensations: truths that we feel more than we know. This concept provides the core structure of my work. 

I am a multi-disciplinary experimental filmmaker. My short movies are non-narrative, mixed media, and abstract. In my work, I am concerned with describing visually the sensory truths that live inside our bodies, the layers (both physical and emotional) that form around our identities, and the natural and unnatural forces that shape us. I seek to engage the emotional consciousness of the viewer, so that they might feel the thesis in their hearts more easily than they can articulate it with their mouths. The themes I explore in my work relate to my own experiences with trauma and mental illness, as well as my identity as a queer person. 

As a filmmaker, I am interested in seeking time-based outcomes that are a mixture of structured fabrication and unknowable chance. By using highly mutable materials such as melting wax, ink in water, watercolor, charcoal powder, or clouds in the sky, I can apply these materials to a certain structure or path, while also feeling assured that what I imagine will not be what I obtain. While the work itself feels structured, the images I gather are quite fluid. I feel compelled to be surprised by the work, in such a way that if I know what the final product will be, I will abandon the project in its early stages, preferring instead to greet the work as it appears. 

Thursday's Child has far to go. My recollections of childhood invariably lead to memories of storm-watching: Of staring out my window with wide eyes and a soft mouth. As I gazed into the storm, I was never more receptive to the vast journey ahead of me, never more aware of my smallness. But it was also in this meditative state that I found I was not afraid of the void, but soothed by it.

 

KRISTA SVALBONAS
Augsburg 1, 2017
layered laser cut pigment print
14 x 21 inches 
 

Laser cut pigment print. Photographs are of former WWII Displaced Person camps in Germany. Text is taken from plea letters that were sent out from the DP camps.

 

STATEMENT 
I am moved to make art that explores the urban landscape. Cracks in the pavement, patterns in windows and fractured views of 
buildings all manifest themselves in my work. I am fascinated with the architecture of the city landscape, it's tiny spaces, it's overlapping structure and it's constant rebirth. I am painting the infrastructure of humanity, finding the areas where we become aware of our own space in the world. My work is built up in layers of thin colored paper, wax and pastel, one layer often obscuring or concealing another. Color,composition, and mark-making are the main organizational concerns of my work. Each piece begins in a very controlled fashion, meticulously combining layers of wax, paper, pastel and photography, a process that could liken itself to the continual excavation and renovation of the urban landscape.

KRISTA SVALBONAS
Bayreuth 2, 2017
layered laser cut pigment prints
14 x 21 inches
 

Layered laser cut pigment prints. Photographs are of former WWII Displaced Person camps in Germany. Text is taken from plea letters that were sent out from the DP camps.

 

STATEMENT 
I am moved to make art that explores the urban landscape. Cracks in the pavement, patterns in windows and fractured views of 
buildings all manifest themselves in my work. I am fascinated with the architecture of the city landscape, it's tiny spaces, it's overlapping structure and it's constant rebirth. I am painting the infrastructure of humanity, finding the areas where we become aware of our own space in the world. My work is built up in layers of thin colored paper, wax and pastel, one layer often obscuring or concealing another. Color,composition, and mark-making are the main organizational concerns of my work. Each piece begins in a very controlled fashion, meticulously combining layers of wax, paper, pastel and photography, a process that could liken itself to the continual excavation and renovation of the urban landscape.

KRISTA SVALBONAS
Eichstatt 2, 2017
layered laser cut pigment print
14 x 21 inches
 

Laser cut pigment print. Photographs are of former WWII Displaced Person camps in Germany. Text is taken from plea letters that were sent out from the DP camps.

 

STATEMENT 
I am moved to make art that explores the urban landscape. Cracks in the pavement, patterns in windows and fractured views of 
buildings all manifest themselves in my work. I am fascinated with the architecture of the city landscape, it's tiny spaces, it's overlapping structure and it's constant rebirth. I am painting the infrastructure of humanity, finding the areas where we become aware of our own space in the world. My work is built up in layers of thin colored paper, wax and pastel, one layer often obscuring or concealing another. Color,composition, and mark-making are the main organizational concerns of my work. Each piece begins in a very controlled fashion, meticulously combining layers of wax, paper, pastel and photography, a process that could liken itself to the continual excavation and renovation of the urban landscape.

KRISTA SVALBONAS
Esslingen 2, 2017
layered laser cut pigment prints
10 x 21 inches

Laser cut pigment print. Photographs are of former WWII Displaced Person camps in Germany. Text is taken from plea letters that were sent out from the DP camps.

 

STATEMENT 
I am moved to make art that explores the urban landscape. Cracks in the pavement, patterns in windows and fractured views of 
buildings all manifest themselves in my work. I am fascinated with the architecture of the city landscape, it's tiny spaces, it's overlapping structure and it's constant rebirth. I am painting the infrastructure of humanity, finding the areas where we become aware of our own space in the world. My work is built up in layers of thin colored paper, wax and pastel, one layer often obscuring or concealing another. Color,composition, and mark-making are the main organizational concerns of my work. Each piece begins in a very controlled fashion, meticulously combining layers of wax, paper, pastel and photography, a process that could liken itself to the continual excavation and renovation of the urban landscape.

KRISTA SVALBONAS
Hanau 1, 2017
layered laser cut pigment print
14 x 21 inches
 

Laser cut pigment print. Photographs are of former WWII Displaced Person camps in Germany. Text is taken from plea letters that were sent out from the DP camps.

 

STATEMENT 
I am moved to make art that explores the urban landscape. Cracks in the pavement, patterns in windows and fractured views of 
buildings all manifest themselves in my work. I am fascinated with the architecture of the city landscape, it's tiny spaces, it's overlapping structure and it's constant rebirth. I am painting the infrastructure of humanity, finding the areas where we become aware of our own space in the world. My work is built up in layers of thin colored paper, wax and pastel, one layer often obscuring or concealing another. Color,composition, and mark-making are the main organizational concerns of my work. Each piece begins in a very controlled fashion, meticulously combining layers of wax, paper, pastel and photography, a process that could liken itself to the continual excavation and renovation of the urban landscape.

MARIAH MORRELL
Olivia, 2017
0.35mm Micron Pen on Paper
40 x 30 inches


This is a piece playing with digital glitching. With this piece looking into the digital age and its effects on people and their identity. 

 

STATEMENT 
My work is about the excess and exuberance of youth. Using excessive mark making to convey the subject of youth and exuberance. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Using my own photography as a blueprint for my drawings, I layer two photos together to create a double of the person in the portrait. Then I begin the process of drawing out the subjects by hand with various forms of precise mark making. This doubling of the person in the photograph is used to represent our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals. My work strives to demonstrate identity, ecstasies, and excess of youthful life through both the forms and the mark making. 

While creating works of art using the medium of pen on paper to explore the idea of order emerging from a disarray and confusion found in the medium. This disarray in the medium is a reflection of the confusion and disharmony found as a contemporary youth. The use of scribbles made with a permanent tool brings to mind an uneasiness and anxiety that will be contrasted with the collection of marks creating a clean and representational image. I create works of art that will find the viewer conflicted and interested at the same time. Conceptually looking at the mark making being loose and uncontrolled referencing a childlike innocent scribble. The combination of chaos in the mark making and the emotional indecision of youth, the medium and subject matter can function together cleanly.

MARIAH MORRELL
Patrick, 2016
0.35mm Micron Pen on Paper
30 x 32 inches
 

This is a two layer portrait that strives to show the differences in people as they go through their life. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Representing our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals.

 

STATEMENT 
My work is about the excess and exuberance of youth. Using excessive mark making to convey the subject of youth and exuberance. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Using my own photography as a blueprint for my drawings, I layer two photos together to create a double of the person in the portrait. Then I begin the process of drawing out the subjects by hand with various forms of precise mark making. This doubling of the person in the photograph is used to represent our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals. My work strives to demonstrate identity, ecstasies, and excess of youthful life through both the forms and the mark making. 

While creating works of art using the medium of pen on paper to explore the idea of order emerging from a disarray and confusion found in the medium. This disarray in the medium is a reflection of the confusion and disharmony found as a contemporary youth. The use of scribbles made with a permanent tool brings to mind an uneasiness and anxiety that will be contrasted with the collection of marks creating a clean and representational image. I create works of art that will find the viewer conflicted and interested at the same time. Conceptually looking at the mark making being loose and uncontrolled referencing a childlike innocent scribble. The combination of chaos in the mark making and the emotional indecision of youth, the medium and subject matter can function together cleanly.

MARIAH MORRELL
Matt, 2016
0.35mm Micron Pen on Paper
30 x 32 inches
 

This is a two layer portrait that strives to show the differences in people as they go through their life. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Representing our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals.

 

STATEMENT 
My work is about the excess and exuberance of youth. Using excessive mark making to convey the subject of youth and exuberance. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Using my own photography as a blueprint for my drawings, I layer two photos together to create a double of the person in the portrait. Then I begin the process of drawing out the subjects by hand with various forms of precise mark making. This doubling of the person in the photograph is used to represent our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals. My work strives to demonstrate identity, ecstasies, and excess of youthful life through both the forms and the mark making. 

While creating works of art using the medium of pen on paper to explore the idea of order emerging from a disarray and confusion found in the medium. This disarray in the medium is a reflection of the confusion and disharmony found as a contemporary youth. The use of scribbles made with a permanent tool brings to mind an uneasiness and anxiety that will be contrasted with the collection of marks creating a clean and representational image. I create works of art that will find the viewer conflicted and interested at the same time. Conceptually looking at the mark making being loose and uncontrolled referencing a childlike innocent scribble. The combination of chaos in the mark making and the emotional indecision of youth, the medium and subject matter can function together cleanly.

MARIAH MORRELL
Maddison, 2016
0.35mm Micron Pen on Paper
40 x 42 inches
 

This is a three layer image that strives to show the differences in people as they go through their life. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Representing our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals.

 

STATEMENT 
My work is about the excess and exuberance of youth. Using excessive mark making to convey the subject of youth and exuberance. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Using my own photography as a blueprint for my drawings, I layer two photos together to create a double of the person in the portrait. Then I begin the process of drawing out the subjects by hand with various forms of precise mark making. This doubling of the person in the photograph is used to represent our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals. My work strives to demonstrate identity, ecstasies, and excess of youthful life through both the forms and the mark making. 

While creating works of art using the medium of pen on paper to explore the idea of order emerging from a disarray and confusion found in the medium. This disarray in the medium is a reflection of the confusion and disharmony found as a contemporary youth. The use of scribbles made with a permanent tool brings to mind an uneasiness and anxiety that will be contrasted with the collection of marks creating a clean and representational image. I create works of art that will find the viewer conflicted and interested at the same time. Conceptually looking at the mark making being loose and uncontrolled referencing a childlike innocent scribble. The combination of chaos in the mark making and the emotional indecision of youth, the medium and subject matter can function together cleanly.

MARIAH MORRELL
Lidia, 2016
0.35mm Micron Pen on Paper
30 x 32 inches

 

This is a two layer portrait that strives to show the differences in people as they go through their life. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Representing our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals.

 

STATEMENT 
My work is about the excess and exuberance of youth. Using excessive mark making to convey the subject of youth and exuberance. Specifically relating to the younger generations voice and how people transform over time and grow out (or sometimes not) of their lifestyles as a young person. Using my own photography as a blueprint for my drawings, I layer two photos together to create a double of the person in the portrait. Then I begin the process of drawing out the subjects by hand with various forms of precise mark making. This doubling of the person in the photograph is used to represent our struggle with separating ourselves from what we think is expected of us, and who we really are as individuals. My work strives to demonstrate identity, ecstasies, and excess of youthful life through both the forms and the mark making. 

While creating works of art using the medium of pen on paper to explore the idea of order emerging from a disarray and confusion found in the medium. This disarray in the medium is a reflection of the confusion and disharmony found as a contemporary youth. The use of scribbles made with a permanent tool brings to mind an uneasiness and anxiety that will be contrasted with the collection of marks creating a clean and representational image. I create works of art that will find the viewer conflicted and interested at the same time. Conceptually looking at the mark making being loose and uncontrolled referencing a childlike innocent scribble. The combination of chaos in the mark making and the emotional indecision of youth, the medium and subject matter can function together cleanly.

VITTORIO OTTAVIANI
Evil Empire, 2017
oil on paper
16 x 22 inches
 

Evil Empire is a portrait of corruption. Some of the officials that we elect to represent our voices and to protect us seem to be motivated by personal greed, which leads to unfortunate consequences for the general population. This painting references the abuse of power.

 

STATEMENT 
Born and raised in Italy, 'Vic', as he is known around town, is an international artist living and working in New York City. His work captures the kaleidoscope of human personality through intricate facial expressions and body gestures. The way Vic sees it, real people make up everyday life situations so it is their strength, simplicity and logic when dealing with larger social issues that he chooses to depict in his artwork. 

To execute his paintings he uses the classical oil technique of 'Fat over Lean' over gesso-prepared wood. He learned this time-honored process as an apprentice working under a Master painter in Italy.

To promote his work to the public, Vic applies Guerrilla Marketing strategies. This unique and alternative approach is rooted in the DIY counter-culture and has also taken cues from popular culture. His objective is to target people in unexpected public places by posting prints of his artwork in an attempt to communicate with them about socially relevant themes.

VITTORIO OTTAVIANI
No Thanks!, 2017
oil on paper
24 x 16 inches
 

No Thanks! is a tribute to the achievements of the African-American people in American society. The work depicts an African-American businessman handing back the lynching noose. The scene serves as proof to those who doubt this group's ability to succeed in society's most highly-regarded positions.

 

STATEMENT 
Born and raised in Italy, 'Vic', as he is known around town, is an international artist living and working in New York City. His work captures the kaleidoscope of human personality through intricate facial expressions and body gestures. The way Vic sees it, real people make up everyday life situations so it is their strength, simplicity and logic when dealing with larger social issues that he chooses to depict in his artwork. 

To execute his paintings he uses the classical oil technique of 'Fat over Lean' over gesso-prepared wood. He learned this time-honored process as an apprentice working under a Master painter in Italy.

To promote his work to the public, Vic applies Guerrilla Marketing strategies. This unique and alternative approach is rooted in the DIY counter-culture and has also taken cues from popular culture. His objective is to target people in unexpected public places by posting prints of his artwork in an attempt to communicate with them about socially relevant themes.

VITTORIO OTTAVIANI
The Battle of New York, 2016
oil on paper

22 x 31.5 inches
 

The Battle of New York - based on a real gunfight between undercover NYPD officers and members of a street gang. This painting highlights the bravery and selflessness of those that choose to protect and serve the community by putting their life in harms way.

 

STATEMENT 
Born and raised in Italy, 'Vic', as he is known around town, is an international artist living and working in New York City. His work captures the kaleidoscope of human personality through intricate facial expressions and body gestures. The way Vic sees it, real people make up everyday life situations so it is their strength, simplicity and logic when dealing with larger social issues that he chooses to depict in his artwork. 

To execute his paintings he uses the classical oil technique of 'Fat over Lean' over gesso-prepared wood. He learned this time-honored process as an apprentice working under a Master painter in Italy.

To promote his work to the public, Vic applies Guerrilla Marketing strategies. This unique and alternative approach is rooted in the DIY counter-culture and has also taken cues from popular culture. His objective is to target people in unexpected public places by posting prints of his artwork in an attempt to communicate with them about socially relevant themes.

VITTORIO OTTAVIANI
Hooky, 2016
oil on paper
14 x 24 inches

Hooky is a tongue-in-cheek portrait of kids rebelling by cutting school for a day to play craps at a handball court. Pop-art and urban symbolism such as graffiti, spray cans, beer, hip hop T-shirts and a skateboard are used to support the world in which these boys live out for the day.

 

STATEMENT 
Born and raised in Italy, 'Vic', as he is known around town, is an international artist living and working in New York City. His work captures the kaleidoscope of human personality through intricate facial expressions and body gestures. The way Vic sees it, real people make up everyday life situations so it is their strength, simplicity and logic when dealing with larger social issues that he chooses to depict in his artwork. 

To execute his paintings he uses the classical oil technique of 'Fat over Lean' over gesso-prepared wood. He learned this time-honored process as an apprentice working under a Master painter in Italy.

To promote his work to the public, Vic applies Guerrilla Marketing strategies. This unique and alternative approach is rooted in the DIY counter-culture and has also taken cues from popular culture. His objective is to target people in unexpected public places by posting prints of his artwork in an attempt to communicate with them about socially relevant themes.

JOHN ISIAH WALTON
Putin Z 2, 2014
oil on canvas
60 x 48 inches
 

Putin wearing 'black face' Mardi Gras paint. Putin's campaign mostly consisted of telling his people that America was to blame for his countries then current financial downfall.

 

STATEMENT 
Political Portraits is a series of portraits of politicians affiliated with parties on the Left and Right painted with oil or acrylic on canvas. Mardi Gras day falls on a Tuesday just as the Presidential Election Day fall on a Tuesday in November. This series was started in early 2012 and ended Spring of 2017. The portraits are a represenation of my thoughts as a child with the curiosity about the identities of the people wearing the black face paint riding the floats on Mardi Gras day. Coincidently around the time of those thoughts the then Governor Edwin Edwards was my hero for defeating David Duke in their battle for the Governors seat of Louisiana in the year of 1991 when I was six years old. Edwards would later go to jail due to being a crooked politician which caused confusion for me and ultimately brought out ideas from my young mind that politicians will put on a mask to get where they need to go and would throw out the kitchen sink to get them into office to achieve their personal goals.

DIANA ZIPETO
Gloria (Gloria Steinem), 2016
acrylic on canvas
20 x 20 inches

 

Still life portrait from Kirigami series - paintings created using folded and cut paper as still life.

 

STATEMENT
My still life portraits investigate issues of women’s empowerment and changing identity. These paintings express women’s strength and struggle for equality in the 21st century. 

Starting with paper photographs of women, I fold, tear, and crumple the images to give them a new 3rd dimension, communicating both disruption and resilience. I make large paintings of the fragile paper constructions to fix transitional moments in a solid form. 

As an American female raised in the 1980s, I have always experienced women’s cultural identity in the midst of powerful and controversial transition. My paintings describe the unique possibility and uncertainty of that experience. This work grew from multi-panel color portraits of women I was making. I moved to single panel paintings in black and white to make the visual statements clearer, with fewer distractions. Distorting photographs of women disrupts our conditioned first responses – ugly/pretty, young/old – and their associated value judgments. Being able to clearly see the subject’s eyes shows her insistence on engaging with the world, and the burden that engagement can cause. 

What is women’s new cultural identity? What can we be? We are in a time where that is still in flux and constantly under siege. My work shows there is purpose in changing what is possible for women, but also an exhaustion that must remain mostly hidden in order to continue forward.

 

DIANA ZIPETO
Georgia (Georgia O'Keefe), 2017
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

 

Still life portrait from Kirigami series - paintings created using folded and cut paper as still life.

 

STATEMENT
My still life portraits investigate issues of women’s empowerment and changing identity. These paintings express women’s strength and struggle for equality in the 21st century. 

Starting with paper photographs of women, I fold, tear, and crumple the images to give them a new 3rd dimension, communicating both disruption and resilience. I make large paintings of the fragile paper constructions to fix transitional moments in a solid form. 

As an American female raised in the 1980s, I have always experienced women’s cultural identity in the midst of powerful and controversial transition. My paintings describe the unique possibility and uncertainty of that experience. This work grew from multi-panel color portraits of women I was making. I moved to single panel paintings in black and white to make the visual statements clearer, with fewer distractions. Distorting photographs of women disrupts our conditioned first responses – ugly/pretty, young/old – and their associated value judgments. Being able to clearly see the subject’s eyes shows her insistence on engaging with the world, and the burden that engagement can cause. 

What is women’s new cultural identity? What can we be? We are in a time where that is still in flux and constantly under siege. My work shows there is purpose in changing what is possible for women, but also an exhaustion that must remain mostly hidden in order to continue forward.

 

DIANA ZIPETO
SBA II (Susan B. Anthony), 2016
acrylic on canvas
30 x 30 inches

 

Still life portrait from a Kirigami series - paintings made using folded and cut paper as still life.

 

STATEMENT
My still life portraits investigate issues of women’s empowerment and changing identity. These paintings express women’s strength and struggle for equality in the 21st century. 

Starting with paper photographs of women, I fold, tear, and crumple the images to give them a new 3rd dimension, communicating both disruption and resilience. I make large paintings of the fragile paper constructions to fix transitional moments in a solid form. 

As an American female raised in the 1980s, I have always experienced women’s cultural identity in the midst of powerful and controversial transition. My paintings describe the unique possibility and uncertainty of that experience. This work grew from multi-panel color portraits of women I was making. I moved to single panel paintings in black and white to make the visual statements clearer, with fewer distractions. Distorting photographs of women disrupts our conditioned first responses – ugly/pretty, young/old – and their associated value judgments. Being able to clearly see the subject’s eyes shows her insistence on engaging with the world, and the burden that engagement can cause. 

What is women’s new cultural identity? What can we be? We are in a time where that is still in flux and constantly under siege. My work shows there is purpose in changing what is possible for women, but also an exhaustion that must remain mostly hidden in order to continue forward.

 

DIANA ZIPETO
Emma (Emma Goldman), 2017
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 inches

 

Still life portrait from Kirigami series - paintings created using folded and cut paper as still life.

 

STATEMENT
My still life portraits investigate issues of women’s empowerment and changing identity. These paintings express women’s strength and struggle for equality in the 21st century. 

Starting with paper photographs of women, I fold, tear, and crumple the images to give them a new 3rd dimension, communicating both disruption and resilience. I make large paintings of the fragile paper constructions to fix transitional moments in a solid form. 

As an American female raised in the 1980s, I have always experienced women’s cultural identity in the midst of powerful and controversial transition. My paintings describe the unique possibility and uncertainty of that experience. This work grew from multi-panel color portraits of women I was making. I moved to single panel paintings in black and white to make the visual statements clearer, with fewer distractions. Distorting photographs of women disrupts our conditioned first responses – ugly/pretty, young/old – and their associated value judgments. Being able to clearly see the subject’s eyes shows her insistence on engaging with the world, and the burden that engagement can cause. 

What is women’s new cultural identity? What can we be? We are in a time where that is still in flux and constantly under siege. My work shows there is purpose in changing what is possible for women, but also an exhaustion that must remain mostly hidden in order to continue forward.

 

DIANA ZIPETO
Shirley (Shirley Chisholm), 2017
acrylic on canvas
36 x 36 in

 

Still life portrait from Kirigami series - paintings created using folded and cut paper as still life.

 

STATEMENT
My still life portraits investigate issues of women’s empowerment and changing identity. These paintings express women’s strength and struggle for equality in the 21st century. 

Starting with paper photographs of women, I fold, tear, and crumple the images to give them a new 3rd dimension, communicating both disruption and resilience. I make large paintings of the fragile paper constructions to fix transitional moments in a solid form. 

As an American female raised in the 1980s, I have always experienced women’s cultural identity in the midst of powerful and controversial transition. My paintings describe the unique possibility and uncertainty of that experience. This work grew from multi-panel color portraits of women I was making. I moved to single panel paintings in black and white to make the visual statements clearer, with fewer distractions. Distorting photographs of women disrupts our conditioned first responses – ugly/pretty, young/old – and their associated value judgments. Being able to clearly see the subject’s eyes shows her insistence on engaging with the world, and the burden that engagement can cause. 

What is women’s new cultural identity? What can we be? We are in a time where that is still in flux and constantly under siege. My work shows there is purpose in changing what is possible for women, but also an exhaustion that must remain mostly hidden in order to continue forward.

 

Press Release

JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY proudly presents the 21st Annual NO DEAD ARTISTS International Juried Exhibition of Contemporary Art. For the 2017 installment of the exhibition, the gallery hosts works by thirteen artists hailing from four continents and eight different states. The exhibition will be on view from 30 August through 30 September 2017, with an Arts District New Orleans’ First Saturday Gallery Opening on 2 September, 6-9 pm.

 

The NO DEAD ARTISTS exhibition was founded by Jonathan Ferrara in 1995 to give a voice to emerging artists. The exhibition's name is derived from the old adage that artists never achieve success until they are dead. NO DEAD ARTISTS turns that notion on its head and gives emerging artists their first break in the art world. In the 90's, the exhibition was open only to New Orleans-based artists and subsequently grew to include artists of Louisiana. In 2010, the exhibition expanded to become a national juried exhibition open to artists from the entire US, and in 2014 the exhibition went international.

  

Now in its 21st iteration, the exhibition has been a springboard for numerous artists; leading to national press coverage, recognition, gallery representation and acquisitions by museums and other prominent collections. Each year the gallery invites a panel of renowned arts professionals and collectors to select the newest creative talents for around the world. Past jurors have included Prospect.1 Founder and Curator Dan Cameron, Museum Director Billie Milam Weisman, Collector and Philanthropist Beth Rudin DeWoody, MacArthur Fellow John Scott, Whitney Trustee and Ballroom Marfa Co-founder Fairfax Dorn, NOMA Director Susan Taylor, former Director of the Andy Warhol Museum Eric Shiner, Director of the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas and Founder/Artistic Director of the VOLTA Fair Amanda Coulson, ArtBridge Curator Jordana Zeldin, Collector and MoMA Board Member Lawrence Benenson, CAMH Director Bill Arning, Brooklyn Museum Board member Stephanie Ingrassia, and Collector and Prospect New Orleans Biennial board member Nick Mayor and director/owner of Art Market Productions Max Fishko, Associate Curator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco Anastasia James, Director of Perez Art Museum Miami and Artistic Director of Prospect.3 Biennial, New Orleans Franklin Sirmans and major collector Lester Marks.

For the 2017 edition, three renowned arts professionals served as the NO DEAD ARTISTS jury :::

HELEN TOOMER (New York, NY) – Co-Founder/ Artistic Director of Stoneleaf Retreat Artist Residency, Former Director of PULSE Contemporary Art Fair and Professor at Sotheby’s New York

BETTINA STIEWE (San Francisco/Bay Area, CA) – Co-Founder of Upstart Modern Art Consulting and Artist Management Firm 

GIA HAMILTON (New Orleans, LA) – Director of Joan Mitchell Center, Independent Curator (Atlanta Biennial 2016)

 

Of the approximate 2,500 artworks submitted to this jury by over 500 artists worldwide, only thirteen artists were selected to have their work exhibited at JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY.

 

::: The 21st Annual NO DEAD ARTISTS finalists :::

TONY DAGRADI - New Orleans, LA

JENNIFER DAY - Tucson, AZ

NELMARIE DU PREEZ - Pretoria, South Africa

IVY GUILD - San Diego, CA

MARILYN HENRION - New York, New York

RICHARD HRICKO -  Philadelphia, PA

YEHRIM LEE - Cheong Ju, South Korea

MARIAH MORRELL - La Cruces, NM

VITTORIO OTTAVIANI - Colleferro, Italy

MARET POLZINE  - Minneapolis, MN

KRISTA SVALBONAS - Philadelphia, PA

JOHN ISIAH WALTON - New Orleans, LA

DIANA ZIPETO - Lowell, Massachusetts

 

Comprised of painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, printmaking, mixed-media, installation, ceramics, video and new media, NO DEAD ARTISTS continues to exhibit a great diversity in media yet with a cohesive cross-section of the pulse of Contemporary Art. Presenting over 40 artworks ranging in media, style and purpose from the hand-cut, transpositioned books of New Orleans-based Tony Dagradi to the architectural and landscape painting of second-time finalist, Jennifer Day. Other highlights of the exhibition include South Korean artist Yehrim Lee’s ceramic and mixed media installation that inhabits the center of the main gallery and the socio-political commentary paintings of Italian artist Vittorio Ottaviani. South Africa’s Nelmarie du Preez’s conceptual video pieces in the centre gallery beckon the viewer to search and interpret them.  For the 21st year in a row NO DEAD ARTISTS showcases the lastest trends and talent in contemporary art.

 

For the grand prize of the exhibition, one of the selected jury winning artists will be awarded a solo exhibition in 2017 at JFG. Previous recipient awardees: Nikki Rosato (2012, Washington D.C.), Marna Shopoff (2014, Indianapolis), Richelle Gribble (Los Angeles, 2015) and Ti-Rock Moore (New Orleans, 2016) not only received the solo show at gallery, but also, have successfully gone on to exhibit in art fairs in New York, Miami, Basel (Switzerland), Leipzig (Germany), San Francisco, Houston and Seattle and other traveling exhibitions worldwide. These artists and the No Dead Artists exhibition have garnered great interest from curators, museums and press. . . Stay tuned for the announcement of the 2017 winner at the close of the exhibition.

 

For more information, press or sales inquiries please contact the gallery director Matthew Weldon Showman at 504.522.5471 or email matthew@jonathanferraragallery.com. Please join the conversation with JFG on Facebook (@Jonathan Ferrara Gallery), Twitter (@JFerraraGallery), and Instagram (@JonathanFerraraGallery) via the hashtags #NoDeadArtists, #NDA2017 and #JonathanFerraraGallery.