23RD ANNUAL NO DEAD ARTISTS

International Juried Exhibition of Contemporary Art

September 4 – 27, 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ABE ABRAHAM

Salt Water, 2017

HD Video

5:21 running time

 

Salt Water explores the contrast between the force of natural events and our own need and desire for stability.  The work opens with an abstract sculptural mass of more than twenty dancers interlocked with bare curved backs that sway, rise, and fall in wave-like motions. Individual identification is only a momentary glimpse.  Beneath the abstract form, intimate human connections reside.  For the viewer, this negotiation between a distant abstract surface and a face in close proximity evokes a stroke of empathy; a call from the depths that is once again swept away.  The work's central challenge is to expose the humanity and complexity of the individual as she or he exists within the crowd.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

In the video-art medium, I work with dancers to create abstract sculptural forms that evolve over time. Drawing on the processes of various sculptors, specifically those who exploit the physical potential of a single material, I work to create an intricate mass that transcends the recognition of an individual body.  To investigate this potential, the living sculpture is set up to respond to a dynamic range of conditions beyond its control, much in the way that weather patterns shift geological formations. Both planned and improvised variations of light placement, lens choice, camera angle, camera movement, and the dancers' dynamics are tools used to stimulate this process.  Both intended and unforeseen images materialize out of this variation of circumstances. I leave enough of an opening just past my control so that the structures combined with the circumstances can deliver more than what I have pre-conceived; something I have never seen before.

 

b i o   | | |

ABE ABRAHAM received his BFA in Dance from the Tisch School for the Arts at New York University.  As the artistic director of Abanar, Mr. Abraham creates video-art works that feature dancers from some of the leading dance companies in the world, including New York City Ballet, Alvin Ailey, Complexions, Shen Wei, Stephen Petronio, and Dutch National Ballet.  His most recent work “Salt Water” has appeared in over forty film festivals and exhibitions around the globe and has won several awards, including Best Film at the 31st Minimalen Short Film Festival in Norway, Best Experimental Film Awards at Sydney World Film Festival and The Harlem International Film Festival, Best Editing at ANSFF in Buenos Aires, and the Nova Prize in New York City.

CHRIS BARNARD

The Evidence of Things Seen, 2017

oil on canvas over panel

81h x 54w in
205.74h x 137.16w cm

 

An abstracted view of the Art Institute of Chicago's Grand Staircase. The lone sculpture fictionally represents an armed officer pointing a gun at an absent figure.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

In my work, I focus on white supremacy’s relationship to the privileged spaces of my experiences, such as private art and educational institutions. Amidst widening gaps in wealth and opportunity, discussions about race, power, justice, and representation—across visual culture broadly—seem more relevant than ever.

 

In many of my compositions, which reference real sites, I have inserted fictional elements to raise questions about the allegiances and priorities of these institutions, as well as people—including myself—who have benefitted from, or continue to support them. The resulting works are representational, but through gestural passages and color and surface manipulation, I aim to suggest instability, corrosion and decay. In the end, I strive to make engaging paintings that suggest dissonance and ambivalence, that entice and challenge viewers, just as painting them does for me.

 

These paintings are rooted in my contemplating Whiteness and emerge from wrestling with the politics of painting—the connections and gaps between painting and lived experience. They also reflect a love of paint, the act of painting, and the power of the painted image; regard for practitioners past and present, as well as those for whom practice has not been possible; and admission of painting’s complicity with hegemonic power. As always, my process remains driven by questions. In this case, questions like: What role does painting play in the face of concrete social crises? How can my paintings respectfully incorporate­—rather than exploit—relevant and thought-provoking content and imagery? What does it mean to think about racism, dehumanization, injustice, etc., and then to paint such pictures, and in particular as a straight, White man?

 

These questions and this body of work owe much to the work of others, and most acutely to four scholars’ books in particular: The History of White People, by Nell Irvin Painter; Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities by Craig Steven Wilder; The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander; and White Rage, by Carol Anderson. I am greatly indebted to the depth of research and insight that these books represent; each was inspiring as much as it was devastating.  These people’s work, among others, influenced my own immeasurably, concretely sparking ideas for compositions, and more ephemerally—but equally importantly—by setting a standard, a tone, and a spirit for me in the studio that I strive to honor.

 

There is always danger in making art in response to inhumanity and suffering. I do so sincerely and humbly, without claiming success or certainty. And certainly, I recognize that painting has its limitations when compared to direct social action. That said, I believe art enables interaction and introspection for individuals, as well as creates opportunities for dialogue and discussion. My hope is that these works communicate a degree of internal struggle—among and between compositions, materials, processes, intents, and experiences—but, even more importantly, provoke conversation and critical thought.

 

b i o   | | |

CHRIS BARNARD received his BA from Yale and his MFA from The University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles. Having previously held faculty positions at Denison University, Indiana University, and USC, Barnard is currently an associate professor of art at Connecticut College in New London.

 

Barnard’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and New Haven, among other locations, and can be found in public and private collections nationally and internationally. His work is represented by Fred Giampietro Gallery in New Haven, where he and his partner live.

CHRIS BARNARD

Acquitted, 2017

oil on canvas over panel

80h x 66w in

 

This depicts the new giant atrium space at MoMA. In the lower background there is a ghostly rendering of LAPD officers Powell, Koon, Wind, and Briseno, the four acquitted of assault in the beating of Rodney King; in the foreground is a rendering of Carl Andre's '144 Lead Square', a piece that MoMA owns. Andre was acquitted of the murder of Ana Mendiata, his wife.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

In my work, I focus on white supremacy’s relationship to the privileged spaces of my experiences, such as private art and educational institutions. Amidst widening gaps in wealth and opportunity, discussions about race, power, justice, and representation—across visual culture broadly—seem more relevant than ever.

 

In many of my compositions, which reference real sites, I have inserted fictional elements to raise questions about the allegiances and priorities of these institutions, as well as people—including myself—who have benefitted from, or continue to support them. The resulting works are representational, but through gestural passages and color and surface manipulation, I aim to suggest instability, corrosion and decay. In the end, I strive to make engaging paintings that suggest dissonance and ambivalence, that entice and challenge viewers, just as painting them does for me.

 

These paintings are rooted in my contemplating Whiteness and emerge from wrestling with the politics of painting—the connections and gaps between painting and lived experience. They also reflect a love of paint, the act of painting, and the power of the painted image; regard for practitioners past and present, as well as those for whom practice has not been possible; and admission of painting’s complicity with hegemonic power. As always, my process remains driven by questions. In this case, questions like: What role does painting play in the face of concrete social crises? How can my paintings respectfully incorporate­—rather than exploit—relevant and thought-provoking content and imagery? What does it mean to think about racism, dehumanization, injustice, etc., and then to paint such pictures, and in particular as a straight, White man?

 

These questions and this body of work owe much to the work of others, and most acutely to four scholars’ books in particular: The History of White People, by Nell Irvin Painter; Ebony and Ivy: Race, Slavery, and the Troubled History of America’s Universities by Craig Steven Wilder; The New Jim Crow: Mass Incarceration in the Age of Colorblindness, by Michelle Alexander; and White Rage, by Carol Anderson. I am greatly indebted to the depth of research and insight that these books represent; each was inspiring as much as it was devastating.  These people’s work, among others, influenced my own immeasurably, concretely sparking ideas for compositions, and more ephemerally—but equally importantly—by setting a standard, a tone, and a spirit for me in the studio that I strive to honor.

 

There is always danger in making art in response to inhumanity and suffering. I do so sincerely and humbly, without claiming success or certainty. And certainly, I recognize that painting has its limitations when compared to direct social action. That said, I believe art enables interaction and introspection for individuals, as well as creates opportunities for dialogue and discussion. My hope is that these works communicate a degree of internal struggle—among and between compositions, materials, processes, intents, and experiences—but, even more importantly, provoke conversation and critical thought.

 

b i o   | | |

CHRIS BARNARD received his BA from Yale and his MFA from The University of Southern California (USC) in Los Angeles. Having previously held faculty positions at Denison University, Indiana University, and USC, Barnard is currently an associate professor of art at Connecticut College in New London.

 

Barnard’s work has been shown in solo and group exhibitions in Los Angeles, New York, Chicago, and New Haven, among other locations, and can be found in public and private collections nationally and internationally. His work is represented by Fred Giampietro Gallery in New Haven, where he and his partner live.

HALE EKINCI

Untitled Easterners, 2019
solvent photo transfer, embroidery, crochet, acrylic on bedsheet, metal
42h x 24w in

106.68h x 60.96w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

HALE EKINCI

Untitled Boys Afar, 2019
solvent photo transfer, embroidery, crochet, sequins, acrylic on bedsheet, metal
18h x 18w in
45.72h x 45.72w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

HALE EKINCI

Untitled Brothers, 2018

solvent photo transfer, embroidery, crochet, beads, acrylic on bed sheet

20h x 25w in
50.80h x 63.50w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

HALE EKINCI

Silhouette: Family, 2019

solvent photo transfer, embroidery, crochet, glitter, acrylic on bedsheet, metal

40h x 14w x 14d in
101.60h x 35.56w x 35.56d cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

HALE EKINCI

Untitled Mother (before motherhood), 2019

solvent photo transfer, cotton thread (embroidery), crocheted yarn, glitter, fusible stabilizer, acrylic on a bedsheet

20h x 20w in
50.80h x 50.80w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

HALE EKINCI

Untitled Girl (going into motherhood), 2019

solvent photo transfer, cotton thread (embroidery), crocheted yarn, glitter, fusible stabilizer, acrylic on a bedsheet

20h x 20w in
50.80h x 50.80w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Drawing on the layers of history, transcultural identity, and gender, I paint and embroider colorful family portraits. Domestic fabric surfaces like bedsheets set the stage for solvent transfers of old photos from my Turkish heritage and my American husband. To play with the malleability of self and cultural representation, I obscure the bodies and faces with pattern and color; these families could belong to anyone or no one of a particular background. Using Islamic arts of ornamentation, I embellish the images by painting over the patterns of the fabric and embroidering eclectic, at times gendered, cultural symbols like party hats or papal garments that add an element of humor when combined with carefully posed scenes. Humor, an influential part of my heritage, is fueled by oppression and lack of power and materializes in my work through narratives, satire, and interweaving of customs. These scenes that are inspired by such narratives are then framed with customized, colorful crochet edgings—a nod to the old tradition of “oya” which is a narrow lace trimming used on headdresses of women and household textiles. Both oya and ornamentation hold symbolic meaning based on the shapes and colors that are used as secret communication by their creators—mainly women. The large scale works roll up like rugs, hang like tapestries, and add numerous solvent transfers of social gatherings like protests or celebrations, where the personal and the collective coalesce into one history. Political scenes of the masses peak through layers of decorative symbols in acrylic paint and inkjet monotypes. Similar to the way identity is constructed, through a heavily additive process adorned with a combination of symbolic patterns and densely layered imagery, my work explores the complexity of communication and translation—translation of culture, identity, tradition, and gendered labor.

 

b i o   | | |

HALE EKINSI is a Chicago-based interdisciplinary artist with strong ties to her Turkish heritage.  She received her MFA in Interdisciplinary Arts & Media at Columbia College Chicago and is currently an Associate Professor of Art & Design at North Central College. Focusing on personal history, cultural identity, gender politics, and craft traditions, her works vary from videos and fiber installation to embroidery paintings embellished with vibrant colors, patterns, and autobiographical relics.

 

She is currently a Hatch Projects Artist Resident at Chicago Artist Coalition. Her work has been exhibited nationally at EXPO Chicago, Woman Made Gallery, Giertz Gallery, Bridgeport Art Center, VAE, St. Louis Artists’ Guild, and Queens College Art Center. Her international video screenings include The Nightingale Cinema, Filmfront, College of DuPage, Musrara Mix Festival (Jerusalem, Israel) Trestle Gallery (New York City), CAN TV (Cable Access Channel 21), Momentum Worldwide (Berlin, Germany) and Center for Contemporary Art (Warsaw, Poland). She has been awarded the “Figure and Fiber Award” by Surface Design Association and has completed residencies at ACRE, Jiwar Barcelona, Momentum Worldwide Berlin, and Elsewhere Museum. 

MAGGIE EVANS

Barren Passage, 2018

oil on canvas

22h x 28w in
55.88h x 71.12w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Collective Behavior

Western art has long emphasized the uniqueness of each human being. But beneath these independent identities and myths of rugged individualism lies our deep, intrinsic desire to be part of a group. The group provides security and comfort, but it is also vulnerable to manipulative leadership, oppression of independent thought, and exclusion of those seen as “others.”

 

My paintings use repetitive, uniform imagery to examine this propensity towards collective behavior and its resulting power structures and homogeneity.  Nebulous uniformity is more important to my work than specific narratives.  Yet simultaneously, we are vaguely aware that individual stories exist within the repetitive buildings and isolated interiors.

 

b i o   | | |

MAGGIE EVANS is an artist based in Savannah, Georgia.  She currently uses painting, drawing and installation to examine human collective behavior and the hierarchies, homogeneity and social divisions that result.

 

Maggie has shown her work in fifteen solo exhibits, over fifty group shows and has won a number of awards, including Best of Category for Installation at Artfields 2018 (Lake City, SC) and the 2017 Western Bureau Art Prize (San Jose, CA).  Reviews and publications include The Washington Post, New American Paintings and Manifest Gallery’s INPA 6.  Artist residencies include The Hambidge Center for the Arts (GA) and Central Trak (TX) as well as a full fellowship to the Vermont Studio Center.  In 2011 she was awarded a Chinese Government Scholarship that granted her a studio and stipend for ten months at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China.  She has been invited to lecture on her work at a number of institutions including Indiana-Purdue University and the University of Texas, Dallas.

 

Maggie holds an MFA in Painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design (2008) where she is currently a Professor of Foundation Studies.  In addition to her work as an artist, she performs regularly as a professional jazz singer and bassist.

MAGGIE EVANS

Silent Aspiration, 2018

oil on canvas

36h x 30w in
91.44h x 76.20w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Collective Behavior

Western art has long emphasized the uniqueness of each human being. But beneath these independent identities and myths of rugged individualism lies our deep, intrinsic desire to be part of a group. The group provides security and comfort, but it is also vulnerable to manipulative leadership, oppression of independent thought, and exclusion of those seen as “others.”

 

My paintings use repetitive, uniform imagery to examine this propensity towards collective behavior and its resulting power structures and homogeneity.  Nebulous uniformity is more important to my work than specific narratives.  Yet simultaneously, we are vaguely aware that individual stories exist within the repetitive buildings and isolated interiors.

 

b i o   | | |

MAGGIE EVANS is an artist based in Savannah, Georgia.  She currently uses painting, drawing and installation to examine human collective behavior and the hierarchies, homogeneity and social divisions that result.

 

Maggie has shown her work in fifteen solo exhibits, over fifty group shows and has won a number of awards, including Best of Category for Installation at Artfields 2018 (Lake City, SC) and the 2017 Western Bureau Art Prize (San Jose, CA).  Reviews and publications include The Washington Post, New American Paintings and Manifest Gallery’s INPA 6.  Artist residencies include The Hambidge Center for the Arts (GA) and Central Trak (TX) as well as a full fellowship to the Vermont Studio Center.  In 2011 she was awarded a Chinese Government Scholarship that granted her a studio and stipend for ten months at the China Academy of Art in Hangzhou, China.  She has been invited to lecture on her work at a number of institutions including Indiana-Purdue University and the University of Texas, Dallas.

 

Maggie holds an MFA in Painting from the Savannah College of Art and Design (2008) where she is currently a Professor of Foundation Studies.  In addition to her work as an artist, she performs regularly as a professional jazz singer and bassist.

FELICIA FORTE

Night Cereal, 2017

oil on linen

54h x 48w in
137.16h x 121.92w cm

 

My safe place, my night cave, Detroit.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Loss. Memory. Preservation.

 

My body of work is a visual journal chronicling loss, change, and education. I paint subjects that hook me on an intuitive level, searching for a moment when the least amount of detail meets the truth of my subject. I intuitively decide what enough information is. In the essentialist space of my work, there is room for others to experience their own reality.

 

b i o   | | |

FELICIA FORTE attended the Art Students League of New York in 2006, moving next to San Francisco, CA where she launched her career as a private instructor of painting and a fine artist. She has worked full time as an artist since 2010, exhibiting in many shows nationally and internationally including The BP Portrait Award in 2015 and 2018 for which she was awarded second prize. She has been featured in podcasts and publications including The Huffington Post and Dazed Magazine. Felicia is a highly sought after teacher having taught at museums, schools and privately all over the globe. In 2017 she was invited as resident and grant recipient to the "Redbull House of Art" project. She currently maintains a studio in Detroit, Michigan where she works and offers instruction to private students both in person and online.

FELICIA FORTE

Matthew Reading, 2017

oil on linen

60h x 36w in
152.40h x 91.44w cm

 

A scene from my personal life.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Loss. Memory. Preservation.

 

My body of work is a visual journal chronicling loss, change, and education. I paint subjects that hook me on an intuitive level, searching for a moment when the least amount of detail meets the truth of my subject. I intuitively decide what enough information is. In the essentialist space of my work, there is room for others to experience their own reality.

 

b i o   | | |

FELICIA FORTE attended the Art Students League of New York in 2006, moving next to San Francisco, CA where she launched her career as a private instructor of painting and a fine artist. She has worked full time as an artist since 2010, exhibiting in many shows nationally and internationally including The BP Portrait Award in 2015 and 2018 for which she was awarded second prize. She has been featured in podcasts and publications including The Huffington Post and Dazed Magazine. Felicia is a highly sought after teacher having taught at museums, schools and privately all over the globe. In 2017 she was invited as resident and grant recipient to the "Redbull House of Art" project. She currently maintains a studio in Detroit, Michigan where she works and offers instruction to private students both in person and online.

FELICIA FORTE

Red Light No. 2, 2017

oil on linen

30h x 20w in
76.20h x 50.80w cm

 

A detail revisited from my award-winning painting Time Traveler.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Loss. Memory. Preservation.

 

My body of work is a visual journal chronicling loss, change, and education. I paint subjects that hook me on an intuitive level, searching for a moment when the least amount of detail meets the truth of my subject. I intuitively decide what enough information is. In the essentialist space of my work, there is room for others to experience their own reality.

 

b i o   | | |

FELICIA FORTE attended the Art Students League of New York in 2006, moving next to San Francisco, CA where she launched her career as a private instructor of painting and a fine artist. She has worked full time as an artist since 2010, exhibiting in many shows nationally and internationally including The BP Portrait Award in 2015 and 2018 for which she was awarded second prize. She has been featured in podcasts and publications including The Huffington Post and Dazed Magazine. Felicia is a highly sought after teacher having taught at museums, schools and privately all over the globe. In 2017 she was invited as resident and grant recipient to the "Redbull House of Art" project. She currently maintains a studio in Detroit, Michigan where she works and offers instruction to private students both in person and online.

LESLIE FRY

Panache, 2018

collage on monotype

40h x 26w in
101.60h x 66.04w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My sculptures and drawings are inspired by basic human needs: food, shelter, clothing, and love. The intersection of the natural world and the human-made world drives my work. Female body imagery has been central in my art – based on ways women’s bodies have been controlled and represented throughout history, and on my own experience.

 

I draw, print, model, and cast by combining organic materials such as plants, paper, clay, and fabric with plaster, concrete, metal, and resin. Recent works on paper have taken on new lives as animations. An ongoing series of sculptures, titled Supports, are hybrids of architectural details imbued with human expression about the unruliness of life. Forms are precariously stacked to evoke balance, endurance, holding together, and falling apart.

 

My public art has been a response to architecture, history, and landscape in a given site. My aim is to create images of hope from our “collective unconscious” within public spaces. An example is my large bronze, Colossal AcornHead, commissioned by Tufts University (https://www.lesliefry.com/boston-massachusetts/). This outdoor sculpture is longing to be a real acorn – to be released from its surreal state of artistic abstraction and to return to nature. The sculpture is about human consciousness rooted in nature – that our “heads” and the earth are inseparable and symbiotic. And for a commission in a Manhattan hotel, Freehand, I melded upward-feeling forms of bodies, growing plants, and NYC architecture into eight sculptures (https://www.lesliefry.com/manhattan-new-york/).

 

Diverse influences are from literature, psychology, and mythology. In the visual arts, inspiration ranges from the body/spirit experience of medieval architecture to narrative aspects of the art of Louise Bourgeois and William Kentridge.

 

b i o   | | |

Leslie Fry earned an M.F.A. from Bard College, a B.A. from the University of Vermont, and attended the Central School of Art in London. Her art has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally including Kunsthaus in Hamburg, Hangaram Art Museum in Seoul, Windspiel Galerie in Vienna, Couvent des Cordeliers in Paris, Denise Bibro Fine Art, Artists Space, and Wave Hill in New York, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum near Boston, and Centre des Arts Visuels in Montreal. Born in Montreal, the artist currently lives and works in Winooski, Vermont.

 

Leslie Fry has had public sculptures commissioned in New York, South Korea, Montreal, Florida, Wisconsin, and Vermont. Her artworks are a part of public collections at Tufts University, Songchu International Sculpture Park, Kohler Arts Center, Tampa Museum of Art, Fleming Museum, Kent Museum, and St. Petersburg, Florida’s Museum of Fine Arts.

LESLIE FRY

Panoply, 2018

collage on monotype

40h x 26w in
101.60h x 66.04w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My sculptures and drawings are inspired by basic human needs: food, shelter, clothing, and love. The intersection of the natural world and the human-made world drives my work. Female body imagery has been central in my art – based on ways women’s bodies have been controlled and represented throughout history, and on my own experience.

 

I draw, print, model, and cast by combining organic materials such as plants, paper, clay, and fabric with plaster, concrete, metal, and resin. Recent works on paper have taken on new lives as animations. An ongoing series of sculptures, titled Supports, are hybrids of architectural details imbued with human expression about the unruliness of life. Forms are precariously stacked to evoke balance, endurance, holding together, and falling apart.

 

My public art has been a response to architecture, history, and landscape in a given site. My aim is to create images of hope from our “collective unconscious” within public spaces. An example is my large bronze, Colossal AcornHead, commissioned by Tufts University (https://www.lesliefry.com/boston-massachusetts/). This outdoor sculpture is longing to be a real acorn – to be released from its surreal state of artistic abstraction and to return to nature. The sculpture is about human consciousness rooted in nature – that our “heads” and the earth are inseparable and symbiotic. And for a commission in a Manhattan hotel, Freehand, I melded upward-feeling forms of bodies, growing plants, and NYC architecture into eight sculptures (https://www.lesliefry.com/manhattan-new-york/).

 

Diverse influences are from literature, psychology, and mythology. In the visual arts, inspiration ranges from the body/spirit experience of medieval architecture to narrative aspects of the art of Louise Bourgeois and William Kentridge.

 

b i o   | | |

Leslie Fry earned an M.F.A. from Bard College, a B.A. from the University of Vermont, and attended the Central School of Art in London. Her art has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally including Kunsthaus in Hamburg, Hangaram Art Museum in Seoul, Windspiel Galerie in Vienna, Couvent des Cordeliers in Paris, Denise Bibro Fine Art, Artists Space, and Wave Hill in New York, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum near Boston, and Centre des Arts Visuels in Montreal. Born in Montreal, the artist currently lives and works in Winooski, Vermont.

 

Leslie Fry has had public sculptures commissioned in New York, South Korea, Montreal, Florida, Wisconsin, and Vermont. Her artworks are a part of public collections at Tufts University, Songchu International Sculpture Park, Kohler Arts Center, Tampa Museum of Art, Fleming Museum, Kent Museum, and St. Petersburg, Florida’s Museum of Fine Arts.

LESLIE FRY

Deciding, 2018

collage on monotype

40h x 26w in
101.60h x 66.04w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My sculptures and drawings are inspired by basic human needs: food, shelter, clothing, and love. The intersection of the natural world and the human-made world drives my work. Female body imagery has been central in my art – based on ways women’s bodies have been controlled and represented throughout history, and on my own experience.

 

I draw, print, model, and cast by combining organic materials such as plants, paper, clay, and fabric with plaster, concrete, metal, and resin. Recent works on paper have taken on new lives as animations. An ongoing series of sculptures, titled Supports, are hybrids of architectural details imbued with human expression about the unruliness of life. Forms are precariously stacked to evoke balance, endurance, holding together, and falling apart.

 

My public art has been a response to architecture, history, and landscape in a given site. My aim is to create images of hope from our “collective unconscious” within public spaces. An example is my large bronze, Colossal AcornHead, commissioned by Tufts University (https://www.lesliefry.com/boston-massachusetts/). This outdoor sculpture is longing to be a real acorn – to be released from its surreal state of artistic abstraction and to return to nature. The sculpture is about human consciousness rooted in nature – that our “heads” and the earth are inseparable and symbiotic. And for a commission in a Manhattan hotel, Freehand, I melded upward-feeling forms of bodies, growing plants, and NYC architecture into eight sculptures (https://www.lesliefry.com/manhattan-new-york/).

 

Diverse influences are from literature, psychology, and mythology. In the visual arts, inspiration ranges from the body/spirit experience of medieval architecture to narrative aspects of the art of Louise Bourgeois and William Kentridge.

 

b i o   | | |

Leslie Fry earned an M.F.A. from Bard College, a B.A. from the University of Vermont, and attended the Central School of Art in London. Her art has been exhibited in museums and galleries internationally including Kunsthaus in Hamburg, Hangaram Art Museum in Seoul, Windspiel Galerie in Vienna, Couvent des Cordeliers in Paris, Denise Bibro Fine Art, Artists Space, and Wave Hill in New York, deCordova Sculpture Park and Museum near Boston, and Centre des Arts Visuels in Montreal. Born in Montreal, the artist currently lives and works in Winooski, Vermont.

 

Leslie Fry has had public sculptures commissioned in New York, South Korea, Montreal, Florida, Wisconsin, and Vermont. Her artworks are a part of public collections at Tufts University, Songchu International Sculpture Park, Kohler Arts Center, Tampa Museum of Art, Fleming Museum, Kent Museum, and St. Petersburg, Florida’s Museum of Fine Arts.

JAMMIE HOLMES

Untitled, 2019

acrylic and oil pastels on canvas

60h x 48w x 1.50d in
152.40h x 121.92w x 3.81d cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

I create art because I feel I have been commissioned by the children and adults that grew up like me; not only from my city, but across the world. I’m giving voices to those who have no voice; from the kids in the ghettos of Louisiana, to the child soldiers in Africa. When I create, I paint in stream of conscious flow. I prefer to paint with raw emotion, making sure to never get too attached to previous layers, instead I let them guide me as I continue to add images, symbols, and words in the quest to convey the message burning inside my head. Some of my pieces have hidden words behind them that tell a deeper story. Some have other paintings under the final layers of paint that were just as powerful as the image in front. Each piece has a soul. Each piece is made for you to take a little bit of me or bit of the world with you. Although my work often gets compared to John Michael Basquiat’s style, he is not my biggest influence. My biggest influence is Gordon Parks’ body of photographic works. Parks was commissioned by the world and he captured poignant, yet raw images of everyday people in their natural state. His work spoke to me and I decided to help share the stories he started and the stories of my life in my artwork.

 

b i o   | | |

Born in Thibodaux, Louisiana, a small city 45 minutes from New Orleans Louisiana, JAMMIE HOLMES now lives in Dallas, Texas where he has created an impressive body of work. His paintings are raw with emotions and provide the viewer with an inside look into Holmes’ complex mind. His pieces touch on religious, political and contemporary issues.

 

His bold and expressive paintings are reflections of his upbringing and life events around the world. As a result, many people are fascinated by his story. The value of Holmes' art is steadily increasing, thanks to a growing number of private collectors and celebrity admirers nationwide. He currently has artwork being showcased abroad at Mega Art Gallery in Italy.

JAMMIE HOLMES

Bus Stop At The White House, 2019

acrylic and oil pastels on canvas

60h x 48w x 1.50d in
152.40h x 121.92w x 3.81d cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

I create art because I feel I have been commissioned by the children and adults that grew up like me; not only from my city, but across the world. I’m giving voices to those who have no voice; from the kids in the ghettos of Louisiana, to the child soldiers in Africa. When I create, I paint in stream of conscious flow. I prefer to paint with raw emotion, making sure to never get too attached to previous layers, instead I let them guide me as I continue to add images, symbols, and words in the quest to convey the message burning inside my head. Some of my pieces have hidden words behind them that tell a deeper story. Some have other paintings under the final layers of paint that were just as powerful as the image in front. Each piece has a soul. Each piece is made for you to take a little bit of me or bit of the world with you. Although my work often gets compared to John Michael Basquiat’s style, he is not my biggest influence. My biggest influence is Gordon Parks’ body of photographic works. Parks was commissioned by the world and he captured poignant, yet raw images of everyday people in their natural state. His work spoke to me and I decided to help share the stories he started and the stories of my life in my artwork.

 

b i o   | | |

Born in Thibodaux, Louisiana, a small city 45 minutes from New Orleans Louisiana, JAMMIE HOLMES now lives in Dallas, Texas where he has created an impressive body of work. His paintings are raw with emotions and provide the viewer with an inside look into Holmes’ complex mind. His pieces touch on religious, political and contemporary issues.

 

His bold and expressive paintings are reflections of his upbringing and life events around the world. As a result, many people are fascinated by his story. The value of Holmes' art is steadily increasing, thanks to a growing number of private collectors and celebrity admirers nationwide. He currently has artwork being showcased abroad at Mega Art Gallery in Italy.

KRISTIN MOORE

Don Juan, 2018

oil on panel

18h x 18w x 2d in
45.72h x 45.72w x 5.08d cm

 

Inspired by Ed Ruscha's work, I spent time exploring and documenting Austin's Cesar Chavez district at night; a stark contrast from the bustling daytime tourist hours. This empty restaurant illuminates the quiet nocturnal setting. 

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

KRISTIN MOORE

Ale N Craft, 2018

oil on panel

18h x 18w x 2d in
45.72h x 45.72w x 5.08d cm

 

Inspired by Ed Ruscha's work, I spent time exploring and documenting Austin's Cesar Chavez district at night; a stark contrast from the bustling daytime tourist hours. This banal convenience store is a beacon of light in this quiet nocturnal painting. Promotional signage covers the walls of the exterior, changing the facade to align with the buildings sole commercial purpose. 

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

KRISTIN MOORE

View From The Getty, 2019

oil on panel

24h x 24w x 2d in
60.96h x 60.96w x 5.08d cm

 

Inspired by one of the most prominent views of Los Angeles. This painting explores the city of angels under a thin haze of smog. Noting the duality in the beautiful atmospheric effect with undertones of pollution in the sprawling metropolis.

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

KRISTIN MOORE

Hut's Hamburgers, 2019

oil on panel

8h x 8w x 2d in
20.32h x 20.32w x 5.08d cm

 

This work explores an Austin staple soon to be shuttered like many other nostalgic spots around the city. With Austin’s real estate climate quickly shifting, many Austin staples are forced to shut their doors to make room for newer apartments, condos, or office buildings. This simple neon sign signifies the many meals shared by Austinites over the past decades. 

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

KRISTIN MOORE

Full Moon (Marfa), 2019

oil on panel

8h x 8w x 2d in
20.32h x 20.32w x 5.08d cm

 

Inspired by the endless west Texas skies, this piece showcases the starry night over the Davis Mountains. The full moon glimmers over the horizon. 

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

KRISTIN MOORE

Welcome to Marfa, 2019

oil on panel

8h x 8w x 2d in
20.32h x 20.32w x 5.08d cm

 

The infamous “Welcome To Marfa” sign just outside the small west Texas town greets the viewer in the foreground while the painted sunset glows in the background. 

 

b i o   | | |

Born and raised in Houston, KRISTIN MOORE  began attending art classes at the Glassell School at a young age. She moved to Austin in 2009 to obtain her BA in Art from St. Edward’s University. Soon after graduating, Moore moved to Los Angeles to pursue her MFA at Otis College of Art  + Design. Moore’s first solo exhibition, Rear Window, was unveiled during the culmination of her participation in the MFA program in 2016.

 

Upon moving back to Texas, Moore continued to explore contemporary landscapes through painting. The juxtaposed architecture of LA, the smoggy atmosphere, and unique characteristics of the city became source material for her work. Upon moving back to Texas in 2016, Moore viewed Austin through the same lens; the architecture is quickly changing, a new atmosphere is emerging, and the skyline is directly reflecting those elements. Oscillating between these two bustling cities of Austin & LA, lies the open space and peaceful landscape of Marfa. Texas. Often a favorite pit stop during the long road trips back and forth from Texas to California, Marfa holds space as a source of continued inspiration for Moore.

 

Her Texas roots and California influence have culminated into her current body of work. Often inspired by Ed Ruscha’s work Every Building on the Sunset Strip and A Few Palm Trees, Moore sources the images that influence her paintings from her many car rides, walks, and hikes up to overlooks. A homage to Hollywood, Moore also finds visual influence for her work in the world of film; particularly from visionaries such as Stanley Kubrick, Ridley Scott, and Alfred Hitchcock.

 

Her work has been featured in group exhibitions such as Turbulent Landscapes at Modified Arts in Phoenix, AZ, Excavations; Shindig at Mantle Art Space in San Antonio. TX, and the Vignette Art Fair in Dallas, TX. Her work was awarded “Best In Show” during the exhibition No Man’s Land at the Yard’s Collective in Rochester, NY. She most recently sat as a panelist for Saatchi Art during a collector preview for The Other Art Fair at Park House in Dallas. Her works have found homes in collections from San Francisco, to Marfa, to London. Kristin currently lives in Austin. Her work continues to explore architecture, and atmosphere while oscillating through the ever-changing skyline of Austin, the landscapes of Los Angeles, and the highways in between.

MAIDY MORHOUS

'3 SECOND RULE', 2016

bronze

3h x 9w x 7d in
7.62h x 22.86w x 17.78d cm

 

Who hasn't picked up a piece of dropped food from the floor, given it a quick blow and assumed it was still safe to eat?

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

“Art is a form of communication between the artist and the viewer. Art is about vision, and how that vision is expressed is what can create a strong emotional pull for the observer.”

 

I express myself through the medium of bronze which allows me to portray the extremes of the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. My artwork encompasses the pop theme of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage the viewer and allow them to contemplate and pull from within, and for a moment disengage from the outside world.

What you see is definitely not what you get.

 

The act of creating is an emotional release; it centers, giving an inner peace which allows us to reflect not only on who we are, but how we think and feel.  I realize now, that the pride of being an artist comes not from what one sells, but the inner peace one derives from the act of creating.

 

b i o   | | |

MAIDY MORHOUS is an accomplished printmaker and painter as well as sculptor. Born in New York, she currently creates out of her studio thirty minutes north of San Diego, CA. Morhous received her Master of Fine Arts degree while studying at Stanley Hayter’s Atelier 17 in Paris in the mid-1970s. Before returning to the States, she then traveled to Italy to further her studies in casting techniques at the Fonderia Artistica–Marinelli Foundry in Florence.

 

Morhous expresses herself through the medium of bronze, which allows her to portray extremes, from the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. Her work encompasses the pop art concept of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage viewers and to allow them to contemplate and pull from within, to disengage for a moment from the outside world.

 

Morhous continually searches to portray her environment in the world today. Her contemporary still life sculptures pull viewers in while forcing them to question what is being viewed—be it life and one’s existence, the plight of the world, or merely something to bring a smile. Her idiomatic titles prompt metaphorical interpretations and hint at multilayered meanings. Maidy Morhous is currently showing in museum exhibitions and galleries across the country, and her work can also be found in public and private collections in Japan, England, Europe, Australia and Canada.

MAIDY MORHOUS

DON'T KILL THE GOOSE, 2016

bronze

12h x 7w x 5d in
30.48h x 17.78w x 12.70d cm

 

This idiom originates from one of Aesop's fables in which a farmer and his wife had a goose that laid one golden egg every day. The couple decided to butcher the goose as they thought its insides must be made of gold as well and then they can have all the golden eggs it held within. On killing the goose, they found that the bird was just the same as every other goose on the inside.

 

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

“Art is a form of communication between the artist and the viewer. Art is about vision, and how that vision is expressed is what can create a strong emotional pull for the observer.”

 

I express myself through the medium of bronze which allows me to portray the extremes of the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. My artwork encompasses the pop theme of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage the viewer and allow them to contemplate and pull from within, and for a moment disengage from the outside world.

What you see is definitely not what you get.

 

The act of creating is an emotional release; it centers, giving an inner peace which allows us to reflect not only on who we are, but how we think and feel.  I realize now, that the pride of being an artist comes not from what one sells, but the inner peace one derives from the act of creating.

 

b i o   | | |

MAIDY MORHOUS is an accomplished printmaker and painter as well as sculptor. Born in New York, she currently creates out of her studio thirty minutes north of San Diego, CA. Morhous received her Master of Fine Arts degree while studying at Stanley Hayter’s Atelier 17 in Paris in the mid-1970s. Before returning to the States, she then traveled to Italy to further her studies in casting techniques at the Fonderia Artistica–Marinelli Foundry in Florence.

 

Morhous expresses herself through the medium of bronze, which allows her to portray extremes, from the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. Her work encompasses the pop art concept of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage viewers and to allow them to contemplate and pull from within, to disengage for a moment from the outside world.

 

Morhous continually searches to portray her environment in the world today. Her contemporary still life sculptures pull viewers in while forcing them to question what is being viewed—be it life and one’s existence, the plight of the world, or merely something to bring a smile. Her idiomatic titles prompt metaphorical interpretations and hint at multilayered meanings. Maidy Morhous is currently showing in museum exhibitions and galleries across the country, and her work can also be found in public and private collections in Japan, England, Europe, Australia and Canada.

MAIDY MORHOUS

DOCTOR'S ORDERS, 2016

bronze, granite base

12h x 6w x 5d in
30.48h x 15.24w x 12.70d cm

 

What immediately comes to mind? Yes, you got it! A number of variants of the rhyme were in circulation around the turn of the 20th century. In 1913, Elizabeth Wright recorded a Devonian dialect version and also the first known mention of the version we use now, in Rustic Speech and Folk-lore: 'Ait a happle avore gwain to bed, An' you'll make the doctor beg his bread; or as the more popular version goes, 'An apple a day keeps the doctor away!'

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

“Art is a form of communication between the artist and the viewer. Art is about vision, and how that vision is expressed is what can create a strong emotional pull for the observer.”

 

I express myself through the medium of bronze which allows me to portray the extremes of the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. My artwork encompasses the pop theme of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage the viewer and allow them to contemplate and pull from within, and for a moment disengage from the outside world.

What you see is definitely not what you get.

 

The act of creating is an emotional release; it centers, giving an inner peace which allows us to reflect not only on who we are, but how we think and feel.  I realize now, that the pride of being an artist comes not from what one sells, but the inner peace one derives from the act of creating.

 

b i o   | | |

MAIDY MORHOUS is an accomplished printmaker and painter as well as sculptor. Born in New York, she currently creates out of her studio thirty minutes north of San Diego, CA. Morhous received her Master of Fine Arts degree while studying at Stanley Hayter’s Atelier 17 in Paris in the mid-1970s. Before returning to the States, she then traveled to Italy to further her studies in casting techniques at the Fonderia Artistica–Marinelli Foundry in Florence.

 

Morhous expresses herself through the medium of bronze, which allows her to portray extremes, from the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. Her work encompasses the pop art concept of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage viewers and to allow them to contemplate and pull from within, to disengage for a moment from the outside world.

 

Morhous continually searches to portray her environment in the world today. Her contemporary still life sculptures pull viewers in while forcing them to question what is being viewed—be it life and one’s existence, the plight of the world, or merely something to bring a smile. Her idiomatic titles prompt metaphorical interpretations and hint at multilayered meanings. Maidy Morhous is currently showing in museum exhibitions and galleries across the country, and her work can also be found in public and private collections in Japan, England, Europe, Australia and Canada.

MAIDY MORHOUS

FORTUNATE?, 2017

bronze

11h x 7w x 4d in
27.94h x 17.78w x 10.16d cm

 

A thin cookie served in Chinese restaurants that contains a slip of paper inside, a 'fortune', on which an aphorism or vague prophecy is printed. The American flag is the fortune surrounded by a Chinese cookie? Fortunate? Funny thing though, the Fortune Cookie was created in California, not China! 

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

“Art is a form of communication between the artist and the viewer. Art is about vision, and how that vision is expressed is what can create a strong emotional pull for the observer.”

 

I express myself through the medium of bronze which allows me to portray the extremes of the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. My artwork encompasses the pop theme of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage the viewer and allow them to contemplate and pull from within, and for a moment disengage from the outside world.

What you see is definitely not what you get.

 

The act of creating is an emotional release; it centers, giving an inner peace which allows us to reflect not only on who we are, but how we think and feel.  I realize now, that the pride of being an artist comes not from what one sells, but the inner peace one derives from the act of creating.

 

b i o   | | |

MAIDY MORHOUS is an accomplished printmaker and painter as well as sculptor. Born in New York, she currently creates out of her studio thirty minutes north of San Diego, CA. Morhous received her Master of Fine Arts degree while studying at Stanley Hayter’s Atelier 17 in Paris in the mid-1970s. Before returning to the States, she then traveled to Italy to further her studies in casting techniques at the Fonderia Artistica–Marinelli Foundry in Florence.

 

Morhous expresses herself through the medium of bronze, which allows her to portray extremes, from the soft flow of water to the harsh asphalt pavement of our world. Her work encompasses the pop art concept of presenting commonplace objects as fine art. It is meant to engage viewers and to allow them to contemplate and pull from within, to disengage for a moment from the outside world.

 

Morhous continually searches to portray her environment in the world today. Her contemporary still life sculptures pull viewers in while forcing them to question what is being viewed—be it life and one’s existence, the plight of the world, or merely something to bring a smile. Her idiomatic titles prompt metaphorical interpretations and hint at multilayered meanings. Maidy Morhous is currently showing in museum exhibitions and galleries across the country, and her work can also be found in public and private collections in Japan, England, Europe, Australia and Canada.

 

ELENA SOTERAKIS

We're Fighting a..., 2018

acrylic, oil, and collage on panel

40h x 60w in
101.60h x 152.40w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Ecocide

Ecocide – “destruction of the natural environment, especially when willfully done” 

 

Ecocide was created out of my deep concern for our natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – all of which create our throw-away society, which is causing the destruction of the planet.

 

A spontaneous interplay between oil painting and collage drives the creation of this work. I depict the man-made waste through collage, and use traditional oil painting techniques for the contrasting natural landscape. My collaged detritus imagery is created from multiple layers of discarded magazines, newspapers, and actual garbage, such as plastic bags.

 

In many instances, I source recognizable collage imagery from advertisements in Time and Life magazines from the 1950s and 1960s, which was a time period when large-scale industrialization and suburban consumer culture were particularly romanticized, and significantly contributed to the major environmental problems that we face today.

 

I'm a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With my work, I attempt to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” my most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

b i o   | | |

ELENA SOTERAKIS is a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With her work, she attempts to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” her most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

Soterakis’ work has recently been exhibited nationally at the Center for Contemporary Political Art in Washington D.C. and Winter Street Gallery at Sawyer Yards in Houston, Texas. In addition, she has exhibited throughout New York at the Flowers Gallery, The NARS Foundation, The Islip Museum, The Long Island Museum, Sotheby’s, The NPR/WNYC Jerome L. Greene Space.

 

Northwestern University Press published Soterakis’ artwork as the cover image for William Olsen’s 6th anthology of poems, Techno-Rage. Soterakis also has received a fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts and attended their summer residency program, and was a chosen participant in the New York Foundation for the Arts MARK Program.

 

In January of 2019, Elena Soterakis and fellow artist Jeannine Bardo launched BioBAT Art Space, the first exhibition space in New York City entirely dedicated to the intersection of Science and Art, located in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.  Soterakis received her MFA in painting from the New York Academy of Art and a BFA from The School of Visual Arts. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Visual Arts at Suffolk County Community College and the City University of New York’s Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

ELENA SOTERAKIS

Shoreline of Waste, 2017

acrylic, oil, and collage on panel

22h x 30w in
55.88h x 76.20w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Ecocide

Ecocide – “destruction of the natural environment, especially when willfully done” 

 

Ecocide was created out of my deep concern for our natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – all of which create our throw-away society, which is causing the destruction of the planet.

 

A spontaneous interplay between oil painting and collage drives the creation of this work. I depict the man-made waste through collage, and use traditional oil painting techniques for the contrasting natural landscape. My collaged detritus imagery is created from multiple layers of discarded magazines, newspapers, and actual garbage, such as plastic bags.

 

In many instances, I source recognizable collage imagery from advertisements in Time and Life magazines from the 1950s and 1960s, which was a time period when large-scale industrialization and suburban consumer culture were particularly romanticized, and significantly contributed to the major environmental problems that we face today.

 

I'm a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With my work, I attempt to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” my most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

b i o   | | |

ELENA SOTERAKIS is a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With her work, she attempts to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” her most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

Soterakis’ work has recently been exhibited nationally at the Center for Contemporary Political Art in Washington D.C. and Winter Street Gallery at Sawyer Yards in Houston, Texas. In addition, she has exhibited throughout New York at the Flowers Gallery, The NARS Foundation, The Islip Museum, The Long Island Museum, Sotheby’s, The NPR/WNYC Jerome L. Greene Space.

 

Northwestern University Press published Soterakis’ artwork as the cover image for William Olsen’s 6th anthology of poems, Techno-Rage. Soterakis also has received a fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts and attended their summer residency program, and was a chosen participant in the New York Foundation for the Arts MARK Program.

 

In January of 2019, Elena Soterakis and fellow artist Jeannine Bardo launched BioBAT Art Space, the first exhibition space in New York City entirely dedicated to the intersection of Science and Art, located in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.  Soterakis received her MFA in painting from the New York Academy of Art and a BFA from The School of Visual Arts. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Visual Arts at Suffolk County Community College and the City University of New York’s Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

ELENA SOTERAKIS

People Before Profits, 2017

acrylic, oil, and collage on panel

22h x 30w in
55.88h x 76.20w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Ecocide

Ecocide – “destruction of the natural environment, especially when willfully done” 

 

Ecocide was created out of my deep concern for our natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – all of which create our throw-away society, which is causing the destruction of the planet.

 

A spontaneous interplay between oil painting and collage drives the creation of this work. I depict the man-made waste through collage, and use traditional oil painting techniques for the contrasting natural landscape. My collaged detritus imagery is created from multiple layers of discarded magazines, newspapers, and actual garbage, such as plastic bags.

 

In many instances, I source recognizable collage imagery from advertisements in Time and Life magazines from the 1950s and 1960s, which was a time period when large-scale industrialization and suburban consumer culture were particularly romanticized, and significantly contributed to the major environmental problems that we face today.

 

I'm a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With my work, I attempt to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” my most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

b i o   | | |

ELENA SOTERAKIS is a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With her work, she attempts to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” her most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

Soterakis’ work has recently been exhibited nationally at the Center for Contemporary Political Art in Washington D.C. and Winter Street Gallery at Sawyer Yards in Houston, Texas. In addition, she has exhibited throughout New York at the Flowers Gallery, The NARS Foundation, The Islip Museum, The Long Island Museum, Sotheby’s, The NPR/WNYC Jerome L. Greene Space.

 

Northwestern University Press published Soterakis’ artwork as the cover image for William Olsen’s 6th anthology of poems, Techno-Rage. Soterakis also has received a fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts and attended their summer residency program, and was a chosen participant in the New York Foundation for the Arts MARK Program.

 

In January of 2019, Elena Soterakis and fellow artist Jeannine Bardo launched BioBAT Art Space, the first exhibition space in New York City entirely dedicated to the intersection of Science and Art, located in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.  Soterakis received her MFA in painting from the New York Academy of Art and a BFA from The School of Visual Arts. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Visual Arts at Suffolk County Community College and the City University of New York’s Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

ELENA SOTERAKIS

Wedding Rubbish, 2017

acrylic, oil, and collage on panel

22h x 30w in
55.88h x 76.20w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Ecocide

Ecocide – “destruction of the natural environment, especially when willfully done” 

 

Ecocide was created out of my deep concern for our natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – all of which create our throw-away society, which is causing the destruction of the planet.

 

A spontaneous interplay between oil painting and collage drives the creation of this work. I depict the man-made waste through collage, and use traditional oil painting techniques for the contrasting natural landscape. My collaged detritus imagery is created from multiple layers of discarded magazines, newspapers, and actual garbage, such as plastic bags.

 

In many instances, I source recognizable collage imagery from advertisements in Time and Life magazines from the 1950s and 1960s, which was a time period when large-scale industrialization and suburban consumer culture were particularly romanticized, and significantly contributed to the major environmental problems that we face today.

 

I'm a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With my work, I attempt to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” my most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

b i o   | | |

ELENA SOTERAKIS is a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With her work, she attempts to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” her most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

Soterakis’ work has recently been exhibited nationally at the Center for Contemporary Political Art in Washington D.C. and Winter Street Gallery at Sawyer Yards in Houston, Texas. In addition, she has exhibited throughout New York at the Flowers Gallery, The NARS Foundation, The Islip Museum, The Long Island Museum, Sotheby’s, The NPR/WNYC Jerome L. Greene Space.

 

Northwestern University Press published Soterakis’ artwork as the cover image for William Olsen’s 6th anthology of poems, Techno-Rage. Soterakis also has received a fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts and attended their summer residency program, and was a chosen participant in the New York Foundation for the Arts MARK Program.

 

In January of 2019, Elena Soterakis and fellow artist Jeannine Bardo launched BioBAT Art Space, the first exhibition space in New York City entirely dedicated to the intersection of Science and Art, located in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.  Soterakis received her MFA in painting from the New York Academy of Art and a BFA from The School of Visual Arts. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Visual Arts at Suffolk County Community College and the City University of New York’s Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

ELENA SOTERAKIS

Maternal Wasteland, 2017

acrylic, oil, and collage on panel

22h x 30w in
55.88h x 76.20w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Ecocide

Ecocide – “destruction of the natural environment, especially when willfully done” 

 

Ecocide was created out of my deep concern for our natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – all of which create our throw-away society, which is causing the destruction of the planet.

 

A spontaneous interplay between oil painting and collage drives the creation of this work. I depict the man-made waste through collage, and use traditional oil painting techniques for the contrasting natural landscape. My collaged detritus imagery is created from multiple layers of discarded magazines, newspapers, and actual garbage, such as plastic bags.

 

In many instances, I source recognizable collage imagery from advertisements in Time and Life magazines from the 1950s and 1960s, which was a time period when large-scale industrialization and suburban consumer culture were particularly romanticized, and significantly contributed to the major environmental problems that we face today.

 

I'm a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With my work, I attempt to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” my most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

b i o   | | |

ELENA SOTERAKIS is a Brooklyn based visual artist whose work explores themes of disposability and impending ecological disaster. With her work, she attempts to understand human irrationality and the conflict between America’s throw-away society and the preservation of our environment. “Ecocide,” her most recent series, was created out of a deep concern for the natural world; it is a commentary on unchecked consumerism, corporatism, and monoculture – which is destroying the planet.

 

Soterakis’ work has recently been exhibited nationally at the Center for Contemporary Political Art in Washington D.C. and Winter Street Gallery at Sawyer Yards in Houston, Texas. In addition, she has exhibited throughout New York at the Flowers Gallery, The NARS Foundation, The Islip Museum, The Long Island Museum, Sotheby’s, The NPR/WNYC Jerome L. Greene Space.

 

Northwestern University Press published Soterakis’ artwork as the cover image for William Olsen’s 6th anthology of poems, Techno-Rage. Soterakis also has received a fellowship from the Constance Saltonstall Foundation for the Arts and attended their summer residency program, and was a chosen participant in the New York Foundation for the Arts MARK Program.

 

In January of 2019, Elena Soterakis and fellow artist Jeannine Bardo launched BioBAT Art Space, the first exhibition space in New York City entirely dedicated to the intersection of Science and Art, located in the Brooklyn Army Terminal.  Soterakis received her MFA in painting from the New York Academy of Art and a BFA from The School of Visual Arts. She is also an Adjunct Professor of Visual Arts at Suffolk County Community College and the City University of New York’s Stella and Charles Guttman Community College.

SUSANNA STORCH

Facade V, 2015

acrylic on canvas

31.50h x 31.50w in
80h x 80w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work can be classified as Figurative Realism, focused on the human being I have been consistently developing this theme in several series of paintings. I have focused on portraits, the human body and it’s movements in the Nude series, Menschenbilder/Ballet, man and nature in the Landscapes series, and man and war in the Against War paintings.

 

Currently, I’m working on a series called Facades, which is focused on the presentation of randomly observed everyday life in an urban context. Window scenes, first photographically captured in passing, throw a glimpse into the lives of the anonymous inhabitants, on the border between private and public space. The paintings are based on motives I found in different cities, such as Paris, Prague, London, Santiago de Chile, Valparaiso, Frankfurt, Lisbon, Tallin and Mainz, my hometown.

 

b i o   | | |

SUSANNA STORCH is a freelance artist living and working in Mainz, Germany, near Frankfurt.

SUSANNA STORCH

Facade X, 2016

acrylic on canvas

62.99h x 47.24w in
160h x 120w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work can be classified as Figurative Realism, focused on the human being I have been consistently developing this theme in several series of paintings. I have focused on portraits, the human body and it’s movements in the Nude series, Menschenbilder/Ballet, man and nature in the Landscapes series, and man and war in the Against War paintings.

 

Currently, I’m working on a series called Facades, which is focused on the presentation of randomly observed everyday life in an urban context. Window scenes, first photographically captured in passing, throw a glimpse into the lives of the anonymous inhabitants, on the border between private and public space. The paintings are based on motives I found in different cities, such as Paris, Prague, London, Santiago de Chile, Valparaiso, Frankfurt, Lisbon, Tallin and Mainz, my hometown.

 

b i o   | | |

SUSANNA STORCH is a freelance artist living and working in Mainz, Germany, near Frankfurt.

SUSANNA STORCH

Facade XII, 2016

acrylic on canvas

43.31h x 43.31w in
110h x 110w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work can be classified as Figurative Realism, focused on the human being I have been consistently developing this theme in several series of paintings. I have focused on portraits, the human body and it’s movements in the Nude series, Menschenbilder/Ballet, man and nature in the Landscapes series, and man and war in the Against War paintings.

 

Currently, I’m working on a series called Facades, which is focused on the presentation of randomly observed everyday life in an urban context. Window scenes, first photographically captured in passing, throw a glimpse into the lives of the anonymous inhabitants, on the border between private and public space. The paintings are based on motives I found in different cities, such as Paris, Prague, London, Santiago de Chile, Valparaiso, Frankfurt, Lisbon, Tallin and Mainz, my hometown.

 

b i o   | | |

SUSANNA STORCH is a freelance artist living and working in Mainz, Germany, near Frankfurt.

MOMMA TRIED

The Furbaeum, 2018

mixed media, digital photography, augmented reality installation

96h x 84w in
243.84h x 213.36w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   The Furbaeum

The Furbaeum explores the relationship between humans and machines, reflecting on persistent collective biases and superstitions towards the robotic other. Introduced in 1998, Furby was the first widely successful domestic robot, but in the last 20 years Furby has suffered a steady decline into the uncanny valley. Perhaps the best indication of Furby’s fate is revealed by a YouTube search for “Furby” which yields top results such as, I Bought A Haunted Furby (Unboxing It - SO SCARY); EL FURBY DEL INFIERNO; and Crushing Furby with Hydraulic Press.

 

The Furbaeum invites the viewer to consider how our treatment of these companion robots is not a justified response, but rather a reflection of the darkness within ourselves. The song that is revealed when The Furbaeum is activated references another once-beloved automatronic toy, appearing here as the robot’s dream for a future where they are neither feared nor abused.

 

b i o   | | | 

MOMMA TRIED is the transmedia collaboration of Theo Eliezer and Micah Learned. Their artworks have been exhibited internationally, including the CICA Museum, South Korea; Think Tank Gallery, Los Angeles; and Cooper Union, New York, and their publication Momma Tried has been stocked in locations such as the Tate Modern, Palais de Tokyo, and MoMA PS1. Their recent accomplishments include publishing the third issue of Momma Tried; creating an augmented reality application for iOS and Android; being commissioned by Locust Projects to create an augmented reality installation for their 20th anniversary exhibition; and speaking as a conference co-panelist with the artist Mel Chin.

CARLIE TROSCLAIR

Untitled (Column Collapse), 2019

latex and wood

96h x 125w x 41d in
243.84h x 317.50w x 104.14d cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Structural and decorative layers create the narrative of a building’s material history throughout its lifespan. Wallpaper, concrete, and plaster build up over time forming multiple layers of architectural skin. Once abandoned and left to the elements these additions begin to unfurl and expand, revealing hidden layers once buried within the walls. Approached through a lens of reordering and discovery, my work investigates these shifts through additive and subtractive techniques that meld uncovered and discovered layers.

 

Even when a house sits gutted and abandoned the presence of the body still lingers. Architectural components carry with them the layered histories of previous residents. These become the shells we leave behind. Relics of habitation and home-making. Latex castings of banisters and brick walls act as intimate signatures of the past and semblances of the future. These disassociated architectural fragments illustrate a preservation of sorts, embedded with the shared histories of multiple lives lived.

 

b i o   | | |

CARLIE TROSCLAIR (b. New Orleans) is an installation artist based in New Orleans, LA and St. Louis, MO. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute.

 

Select residencies include Joan Mitchell Center (LA), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (NE), MASS MoCA (MA), Oxbow (MI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO).  Trosclair’s work has been featured in Art in America, The New York Times, ArtFile Magazine, and Temporary Art Review, among others. She is the recipient of the Riverfront Time's Mastermind Award, Creative Stimulus Award, Regional Arts Commission Artist Fellowship, and the Great Rivers Biennial. Trosclair was recently selected as an exhibiting artist for the inaugural Open Spaces Biennial in Kansas City, MO curated by Dan Cameron.

CARLIE TROSCLAIR

Window Dressing, 2017

latex and wood

60h x 48w in
152.40h x 121.92w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Structural and decorative layers create the narrative of a building’s material history throughout its lifespan. Wallpaper, concrete, and plaster build up over time forming multiple layers of architectural skin. Once abandoned and left to the elements these additions begin to unfurl and expand, revealing hidden layers once buried within the walls. Approached through a lens of reordering and discovery, my work investigates these shifts through additive and subtractive techniques that meld uncovered and discovered layers.

 

Even when a house sits gutted and abandoned the presence of the body still lingers. Architectural components carry with them the layered histories of previous residents. These become the shells we leave behind. Relics of habitation and home-making. Latex castings of banisters and brick walls act as intimate signatures of the past and semblances of the future. These disassociated architectural fragments illustrate a preservation of sorts, embedded with the shared histories of multiple lives lived.

 

b i o   | | |

CARLIE TROSCLAIR (b. New Orleans) is an installation artist based in New Orleans, LA and St. Louis, MO. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute.

 

Select residencies include Joan Mitchell Center (LA), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (NE), MASS MoCA (MA), Oxbow (MI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO).  Trosclair’s work has been featured in Art in America, The New York Times, ArtFile Magazine, and Temporary Art Review, among others. She is the recipient of the Riverfront Time's Mastermind Award, Creative Stimulus Award, Regional Arts Commission Artist Fellowship, and the Great Rivers Biennial. Trosclair was recently selected as an exhibiting artist for the inaugural Open Spaces Biennial in Kansas City, MO curated by Dan Cameron.

CARLIE TROSCLAIR

Corbel III (Cobra), 2019

latex

60h x 41w x 53d in
152.40h x 104.14w x 134.62d cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Structural and decorative layers create the narrative of a building’s material history throughout its lifespan. Wallpaper, concrete, and plaster build up over time forming multiple layers of architectural skin. Once abandoned and left to the elements these additions begin to unfurl and expand, revealing hidden layers once buried within the walls. Approached through a lens of reordering and discovery, my work investigates these shifts through additive and subtractive techniques that meld uncovered and discovered layers.

 

Even when a house sits gutted and abandoned the presence of the body still lingers. Architectural components carry with them the layered histories of previous residents. These become the shells we leave behind. Relics of habitation and home-making. Latex castings of banisters and brick walls act as intimate signatures of the past and semblances of the future. These disassociated architectural fragments illustrate a preservation of sorts, embedded with the shared histories of multiple lives lived.

 

b i o   | | |

CARLIE TROSCLAIR (b. New Orleans) is an installation artist based in New Orleans, LA and St. Louis, MO. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute.

 

Select residencies include Joan Mitchell Center (LA), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (NE), MASS MoCA (MA), Oxbow (MI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO).  Trosclair’s work has been featured in Art in America, The New York Times, ArtFile Magazine, and Temporary Art Review, among others. She is the recipient of the Riverfront Time's Mastermind Award, Creative Stimulus Award, Regional Arts Commission Artist Fellowship, and the Great Rivers Biennial. Trosclair was recently selected as an exhibiting artist for the inaugural Open Spaces Biennial in Kansas City, MO curated by Dan Cameron.

CARLIE TROSCLAIR

Corbel II (Goddess), 2019

latex

36h x 36w x 12d in
91.44h x 91.44d cm x 30.48w

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Structural and decorative layers create the narrative of a building’s material history throughout its lifespan. Wallpaper, concrete, and plaster build up over time forming multiple layers of architectural skin. Once abandoned and left to the elements these additions begin to unfurl and expand, revealing hidden layers once buried within the walls. Approached through a lens of reordering and discovery, my work investigates these shifts through additive and subtractive techniques that meld uncovered and discovered layers.

 

Even when a house sits gutted and abandoned the presence of the body still lingers. Architectural components carry with them the layered histories of previous residents. These become the shells we leave behind. Relics of habitation and home-making. Latex castings of banisters and brick walls act as intimate signatures of the past and semblances of the future. These disassociated architectural fragments illustrate a preservation of sorts, embedded with the shared histories of multiple lives lived.

 

b i o   | | |

CARLIE TROSCLAIR (b. New Orleans) is an installation artist based in New Orleans, LA and St. Louis, MO. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute.

 

Select residencies include Joan Mitchell Center (LA), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (NE), MASS MoCA (MA), Oxbow (MI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO).  Trosclair’s work has been featured in Art in America, The New York Times, ArtFile Magazine, and Temporary Art Review, among others. She is the recipient of the Riverfront Time's Mastermind Award, Creative Stimulus Award, Regional Arts Commission Artist Fellowship, and the Great Rivers Biennial. Trosclair was recently selected as an exhibiting artist for the inaugural Open Spaces Biennial in Kansas City, MO curated by Dan Cameron.

CARLIE TROSCLAIR

Untitled (Reflection), 2017

latex

21h x 46w in
53.34h x 116.84w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

Structural and decorative layers create the narrative of a building’s material history throughout its lifespan. Wallpaper, concrete, and plaster build up over time forming multiple layers of architectural skin. Once abandoned and left to the elements these additions begin to unfurl and expand, revealing hidden layers once buried within the walls. Approached through a lens of reordering and discovery, my work investigates these shifts through additive and subtractive techniques that meld uncovered and discovered layers.

 

Even when a house sits gutted and abandoned the presence of the body still lingers. Architectural components carry with them the layered histories of previous residents. These become the shells we leave behind. Relics of habitation and home-making. Latex castings of banisters and brick walls act as intimate signatures of the past and semblances of the future. These disassociated architectural fragments illustrate a preservation of sorts, embedded with the shared histories of multiple lives lived.

 

b i o   | | |

CARLIE TROSCLAIR (b. New Orleans) is an installation artist based in New Orleans, LA and St. Louis, MO. Trosclair earned an MFA from the Sam Fox School of Design and Visual Arts at Washington University in St. Louis, a BFA from Loyola University New Orleans, and is a Fellow of the Community Arts Training Institute.

 

Select residencies include Joan Mitchell Center (LA), Bemis Center for Contemporary Arts (NE), MASS MoCA (MA), Oxbow (MI), Vermont Studio Center (VT), chashama (NY) and The Luminary Center for the Arts (MO).  Trosclair’s work has been featured in Art in America, The New York Times, ArtFile Magazine, and Temporary Art Review, among others. She is the recipient of the Riverfront Time's Mastermind Award, Creative Stimulus Award, Regional Arts Commission Artist Fellowship, and the Great Rivers Biennial. Trosclair was recently selected as an exhibiting artist for the inaugural Open Spaces Biennial in Kansas City, MO curated by Dan Cameron.

HALFDAN WARDEMANN

What would Darwin say (Pink), 2019

digital print on paper

19.69h x 19.69w in
50h x 50w cm

1 of 100

 

The new energyplan for the modern western man is a way to investigate our relationship to our own body and how far we will go to stay young. Get young or die trying.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

I have studied art in both Barcelona and Oslo. I was accepted into the Royal Academy of Art in Bergen, Norway and into Medical school in Oslo at the same time. I chose Medical school.

 

In the past few years as a surgeon, now specializing in plastic surgery, I have combined art and surgery in my work. On the side, I have been working with traditional graphical techniques at Norwegians Graphical Center. When I found my way into the DGA (digital graphical art), my art has found a new level. Since the art world today is on the brink of a revolution in the same way that the music scene was ten years ago, I have decided to shift the symbioses of art and surgery towards the art side.

 

Social media enlarges the feeling of the self as a strong identity, but at the same time, it is now technically possible to alter or change nearly any part of your body. So, where is the real self?

The ultimate challenge, to do a head-transplantation is near to be performed.

Who then is to bring home the newly operated man, the one married to the head, or the one married to the body?

 

b i o   | | |

HALFDAN WARDEMANN is a surgeon, specializing in plastic surgery, and graphic artist living and working in Oslo, Norway. Halfdan’s work with reconstruction surgery heavily influences his artwork. In his art, he addresses society’s fascination with identity and how it relates to the physical self

HALFDAN WARDEMANN

Waiting for a New Head, 2019

digital print on paper

19.69h x 19.69w in
50h x 50w cm

1 of 100

 

The new energyplan for the modern western man is a way to investigate our relationship to our own body and how far we will go to stay young. Get young or die trying.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

I have studied art in both Barcelona and Oslo. I was accepted into the Royal Academy of Art in Bergen, Norway and into Medical school in Oslo at the same time. I chose Medical school.

 

In the past few years as a surgeon, now specializing in plastic surgery, I have combined art and surgery in my work. On the side, I have been working with traditional graphical techniques at Norwegians Graphical Center. When I found my way into the DGA (digital graphical art), my art has found a new level. Since the art world today is on the brink of a revolution in the same way that the music scene was ten years ago, I have decided to shift the symbioses of art and surgery towards the art side.

 

Social media enlarges the feeling of the self as a strong identity, but at the same time, it is now technically possible to alter or change nearly any part of your body. So, where is the real self?

The ultimate challenge, to do a head-transplantation is near to be performed.

Who then is to bring home the newly operated man, the one married to the head, or the one married to the body?

 

b i o   | | |

HALFDAN WARDEMANN is a surgeon, specializing in plastic surgery, and graphic artist living and working in Oslo, Norway. Halfdan’s work with reconstruction surgery heavily influences his artwork. In his art, he addresses society’s fascination with identity and how it relates to the physical self

HALFDAN WARDEMANN

Headtransplantation, 2019

digital print on paper

19.69h x 19.69w in
50h x 50w cm

1 of 100

 

The new energyplan for the modern western man is a way to investigate our relationship to our own body and how far we will go to stay young. Get young or die trying.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | | 

I have studied art in both Barcelona and Oslo. I was accepted into the Royal Academy of Art in Bergen, Norway and into Medical school in Oslo at the same time. I chose Medical school.

 

In the past few years as a surgeon, now specializing in plastic surgery, I have combined art and surgery in my work. On the side, I have been working with traditional graphical techniques at Norwegians Graphical Center. When I found my way into the DGA (digital graphical art), my art has found a new level. Since the art world today is on the brink of a revolution in the same way that the music scene was ten years ago, I have decided to shift the symbioses of art and surgery towards the art side.

 

Social media enlarges the feeling of the self as a strong identity, but at the same time, it is now technically possible to alter or change nearly any part of your body. So, where is the real self?

The ultimate challenge, to do a head-transplantation is near to be performed.

Who then is to bring home the newly operated man, the one married to the head, or the one married to the body?

 

b i o   | | |

HALFDAN WARDEMANN is a surgeon, specializing in plastic surgery, and graphic artist living and working in Oslo, Norway. Halfdan’s work with reconstruction surgery heavily influences his artwork. In his art, he addresses society’s fascination with identity and how it relates to the physical self.

DEBORAH WASSERMAN

Deluge (1), 2018

acrylic, oil, and cloth on canvas

48h x 45w in
121.92h x 114.30w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Earth’s Cry and Heaven’s Smile

“We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love, and then we return home.” 

– Australian Aboriginal saying

 

Wasserman describes this current body of work as an extension of a long period of experimentation and immersion in public art, performance art and socially engaged art. The former has given her various conceptual and technical tools that have made their way into these paintings. For example, her assemblage of fabric and clothes unto her canvases is inspired by her laundry performance piece Hard Labor: Washing my soiled laundry in public, Socrates Sculpture Park, 2017. Deborah states that it’s important for her to have a ‘Feminist and feminine painterly language that reflects on her experience as a woman, a mother and a worker in today’s society’. Similarly, her on-going visual exploration of the feminine principle in nature, referred to as Mother Earth, grew out of another performance piece in 2016, when Deborah dressed as, and embodied a persona she called Mother Earth/Queen of Trash.

 

Her large paintings, expressive and masterful, swiftly move between figurative and abstract elements and are often layered in their basis, with abstract paint spills. ‘I like to create a dialogue on the picture plane’ says Deborah, ‘between various painterly styles, elements, perspectives and angles as if to claim that there isn’t one reality, one truth, but rather a visual dialogue between multiple perspectives, hybrid stories and points of views.

 

Wasserman’s larger canvases speak to our current ecological situation considering nature from an environmentalist’s perspective depicting trees, forests and landscapes consumed by flood and fire. Invoking the female animus aspect of nature, Deborah often includes eyes, faces and women’s bodies peeking through the landscape with expressions varying from awe to wonder, from fear to blame.

 

Born in Brazil, raised in Israel and now residing in the US, Deborah refers to herself as a ‘nomad’ and a ‘cultural hybrid’. One of her drawings, Strange Fruit, features a rootless prickly pear (“Sabra’, a symbol for ‘native Israeli’) cut off from the earth. Another drawing shows the ideal suburban home sitting on a cloud, but the home has no foundation, no ground or support.

 

Although Deborah’s subject matter has elements of lamentation and loss, the beauty and poetry of her work, as the title suggests, is also soothing, uplifting and hopeful. As an artist and an educator, she believes in the power of art to move and inspire people and hopes.

 

“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children.”

– Native American saying

 

b i o   | | |   

DEBORAH WASSERMAN is a graduate of the California Institute of the Arts and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.  She has received grants from the Experimental Television Center, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Aljira Center for the Arts and the America-Israel cultural foundation. Her work has been exhibited in the USA, Brazil, the Netherlands, Germany and Israel, in such venues as The Bronx Museum of the Arts, The Tel Aviv Museum of the Arts, The Museum Of New Art, The World Wide Video Festival, White Columns, Pierogi 2000, Socrates Park and A.I.R gallery. In 2016 Deborah was awarded an IAP Social Practice fellowship from NYFA and a Su- Casa grant from Queens Council On the Arts.

DEBORAH WASSERMAN

Deluge (3), 2019

acrylic, oil, and cloth on canvas

48h x 36w in
121.92h x 91.44w cm

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |   Earth’s Cry and Heaven’s Smile

“We are all visitors to this time, this place. We are just passing through. Our purpose here is to observe, to learn, to grow, to love, and then we return home.” 

– Australian Aboriginal saying

 

Wasserman describes this current body of work as an extension of a long period of experimentation and immersion in public art, performance art and socially engaged art. The former has given her various conceptual and technical tools that have made their way into these paintings. For example, her assemblage of fabric and clothes unto her canvases is inspired by her laundry performance piece Hard Labor: Washing my soiled laundry in public, Socrates Sculpture Park, 2017. Deborah states that it’s important for her to have a ‘Feminist and feminine painterly language that reflects on her experience as a woman, a mother and a worker in today’s society’. Similarly, her on-going visual exploration of the feminine principle in nature, referred to as Mother Earth, grew out of another performance piece in 2016, when Deborah dressed as, and embodied a persona she called Mother Earth/Queen of Trash.

 

Her large paintings, expressive and masterful, swiftly move between figurative and abstract elements and are often layered in their basis, with abstract paint spills. ‘I like to create a dialogue on the picture plane’ says Deborah, ‘between various painterly styles, elements, perspectives and angles as if to claim that there isn’t one reality, one truth, but rather a visual dialogue between multiple perspectives, hybrid stories and points of views.’

 

Wasserman’s larger canvases speak to our current ecological situation considering nature from an environmentalist’s perspective depicting trees, forests and landscapes consumed by flood and fire. Invoking the female animus aspect of nature, Deborah often includes eyes, faces and women’s bodies peeking through the landscape with expressions varying from awe to wonder, from fear to blame.

 

Born in Brazil, raised in Israel and now residing in the US, Deborah refers to herself as a ‘nomad’ and a ‘cultural hybrid’. One of her drawings, Strange Fruit, features a rootless prickly pear (“Sabra’, a symbol for ‘native Israeli’) cut off from the earth. Another drawing shows the ideal suburban home sitting on a cloud, but the home has no foundation, no ground or support.

 

Although Deborah’s subject matter has elements of lamentation and loss, the beauty and poetry of her work, as the title suggests, is also soothing, uplifting and hopeful. As an artist and an educator, she believes in the power of art to move and inspire people and hopes.

 

“We do not inherit the earth from our ancestors; we borrow it from our children.”

– Native American saying

 

b i o   | | |   

DEBORAH WASSERMAN is a graduate of the California Institute of the Arts and the Whitney Museum Independent Study Program.  She has received grants from the Experimental Television Center, Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Aljira Center for the Arts and the America-Israel cultural foundation. Her work has been exhibited in the USA, Brazil, the Netherlands, Germany and Israel, in such venues as The Bronx Museum of the Arts, The Tel Aviv Museum of the Arts, The Museum Of New Art, The World Wide Video Festival, White Columns, Pierogi 2000, Socrates Park and A.I.R gallery. In 2016 Deborah was awarded an IAP Social Practice fellowship from NYFA and a Su- Casa grant from Queens Council On the Arts.

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI

Julian the Apostate, 2019

oil on canvas

40h x 30w in
101.60h x 76.20w cm

 

Julian is raised triumphantly by his vintage fire fighters. The children rejoice.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work is an expression of my interest in both history and art and how these things morph together to create identity and culture. I am especially interested in how history functions as a malleable source material that can be shaped and molded to express a wide range of social or political beliefs. To explore this concept, I have distilled my imagery into combinations of five themes: science, religion, sports, war, and economics. Each one of these disciplines promises some kind of truth or absolutism yet is subject to manipulation to suit the needs of contemporary ideology. The relationships that develop among these cultural strands become contradictory, paradoxical, or unstable.

 

Painting is an ideal vehicle for exploring these ideas as the painted image carries tremendous cultural weight. Painting also remains a vital part of contemporary art and as such is a concept-driven expression of the individual. Equally as important, there is an inherent expectation of discovering truth through the hand of the artist in the painted, narrative image. This is a powerful force in the mind of the viewer. I present the possibility of meaning through various appropriations and arrangements, however, it is up to the viewer to find the connections and relationships necessary for a personal interpretation.

 

b i o   | | |

TOM WERGZYNOWSKI is a studio artist who uses traditional methods of oil painting to explore the disjointed nature of contemporary culture. His primary body of work explores this theme through a constructed symbolic system that reflects both a personal and societal desire for meaning.

 

He received BA degrees from the University of South Carolina in both History and Art Studio and his MFA in Painting from the University of Alabama. He has been a full-time instructor at the University of Alabama since 2006, where he teaches both Art Studio and Art History classes. The process of teaching Art History has greatly informed his work, especially in thinking about how artists chronicle the times in which they live. He has been regularly exhibiting work for close to twenty years, most recently at the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan (AL), Lowe Mill in Huntsville (AL), and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick (MD). He is also a past recipient of an emergency support grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

Tom lives in Tuscaloosa (AL) with his wife, studio mate, colleague, and frequent collaborator, artist Charlotte Wegrzynowski, and two sons, Sam and Ben.

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI

The Red Planet, 2019

oil on canvas

32h x 24w in
81.28h x 60.96w cm

 

The colonization of Mars continues. It looks like the first crop of peppers is ready to harvest.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work is an expression of my interest in both history and art and how these things morph together to create identity and culture. I am especially interested in how history functions as a malleable source material that can be shaped and molded to express a wide range of social or political beliefs. To explore this concept, I have distilled my imagery into combinations of five themes: science, religion, sports, war, and economics. Each one of these disciplines promises some kind of truth or absolutism yet is subject to manipulation to suit the needs of contemporary ideology. The relationships that develop among these cultural strands become contradictory, paradoxical, or unstable.

 

Painting is an ideal vehicle for exploring these ideas as the painted image carries tremendous cultural weight. Painting also remains a vital part of contemporary art and as such is a concept-driven expression of the individual. Equally as important, there is an inherent expectation of discovering truth through the hand of the artist in the painted, narrative image. This is a powerful force in the mind of the viewer. I present the possibility of meaning through various appropriations and arrangements, however, it is up to the viewer to find the connections and relationships necessary for a personal interpretation.

 

b i o   | | |

TOM WERGZYNOWSKI is a studio artist who uses traditional methods of oil painting to explore the disjointed nature of contemporary culture. His primary body of work explores this theme through a constructed symbolic system that reflects both a personal and societal desire for meaning.

 

He received BA degrees from the University of South Carolina in both History and Art Studio and his MFA in Painting from the University of Alabama. He has been a full-time instructor at the University of Alabama since 2006, where he teaches both Art Studio and Art History classes. The process of teaching Art History has greatly informed his work, especially in thinking about how artists chronicle the times in which they live. He has been regularly exhibiting work for close to twenty years, most recently at the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan (AL), Lowe Mill in Huntsville (AL), and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick (MD). He is also a past recipient of an emergency support grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

Tom lives in Tuscaloosa (AL) with his wife, studio mate, colleague, and frequent collaborator, artist Charlotte Wegrzynowski, and two sons, Sam and Ben.

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI

D Day, 2018

oil on canvas

63h x 48w in
160.02h x 121.92w cm

 

The invasion has been an unqualified success.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work is an expression of my interest in both history and art and how these things morph together to create identity and culture. I am especially interested in how history functions as a malleable source material that can be shaped and molded to express a wide range of social or political beliefs. To explore this concept, I have distilled my imagery into combinations of five themes: science, religion, sports, war, and economics. Each one of these disciplines promises some kind of truth or absolutism yet is subject to manipulation to suit the needs of contemporary ideology. The relationships that develop among these cultural strands become contradictory, paradoxical, or unstable.

 

Painting is an ideal vehicle for exploring these ideas as the painted image carries tremendous cultural weight. Painting also remains a vital part of contemporary art and as such is a concept-driven expression of the individual. Equally as important, there is an inherent expectation of discovering truth through the hand of the artist in the painted, narrative image. This is a powerful force in the mind of the viewer. I present the possibility of meaning through various appropriations and arrangements, however, it is up to the viewer to find the connections and relationships necessary for a personal interpretation.

 

b i o   | | |

TOM WERGZYNOWSKI is a studio artist who uses traditional methods of oil painting to explore the disjointed nature of contemporary culture. His primary body of work explores this theme through a constructed symbolic system that reflects both a personal and societal desire for meaning.

 

He received BA degrees from the University of South Carolina in both History and Art Studio and his MFA in Painting from the University of Alabama. He has been a full-time instructor at the University of Alabama since 2006, where he teaches both Art Studio and Art History classes. The process of teaching Art History has greatly informed his work, especially in thinking about how artists chronicle the times in which they live. He has been regularly exhibiting work for close to twenty years, most recently at the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan (AL), Lowe Mill in Huntsville (AL), and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick (MD). He is also a past recipient of an emergency support grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

Tom lives in Tuscaloosa (AL) with his wife, studio mate, colleague, and frequent collaborator, artist Charlotte Wegrzynowski, and two sons, Sam and Ben.

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI

Liberation Day, 2018

oil on canvas

40h x 30w in
101.60h x 76.20w cm

 

With liberation came a new way of living, and we quickly forgot the bad things.

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work is an expression of my interest in both history and art and how these things morph together to create identity and culture. I am especially interested in how history functions as a malleable source material that can be shaped and molded to express a wide range of social or political beliefs. To explore this concept, I have distilled my imagery into combinations of five themes: science, religion, sports, war, and economics. Each one of these disciplines promises some kind of truth or absolutism yet is subject to manipulation to suit the needs of contemporary ideology. The relationships that develop among these cultural strands become contradictory, paradoxical, or unstable.

 

Painting is an ideal vehicle for exploring these ideas as the painted image carries tremendous cultural weight. Painting also remains a vital part of contemporary art and as such is a concept-driven expression of the individual. Equally as important, there is an inherent expectation of discovering truth through the hand of the artist in the painted, narrative image. This is a powerful force in the mind of the viewer. I present the possibility of meaning through various appropriations and arrangements, however, it is up to the viewer to find the connections and relationships necessary for a personal interpretation.

 

b i o   | | |

TOM WERGZYNOWSKI is a studio artist who uses traditional methods of oil painting to explore the disjointed nature of contemporary culture. His primary body of work explores this theme through a constructed symbolic system that reflects both a personal and societal desire for meaning.

 

He received BA degrees from the University of South Carolina in both History and Art Studio and his MFA in Painting from the University of Alabama. He has been a full-time instructor at the University of Alabama since 2006, where he teaches both Art Studio and Art History classes. The process of teaching Art History has greatly informed his work, especially in thinking about how artists chronicle the times in which they live. He has been regularly exhibiting work for close to twenty years, most recently at the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan (AL), Lowe Mill in Huntsville (AL), and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick (MD). He is also a past recipient of an emergency support grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

Tom lives in Tuscaloosa (AL) with his wife, studio mate, colleague, and frequent collaborator, artist Charlotte Wegrzynowski, and two sons, Sam and Ben.

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI

The Death of Caesar, 2017

oil on canvas

40h x 30w in
101.60h x 76.20w cm

 

Did our leader fall to his death, or did he ascend to leave us on our own?

 

s t a t e m e n t   | | |

My work is an expression of my interest in both history and art and how these things morph together to create identity and culture. I am especially interested in how history functions as a malleable source material that can be shaped and molded to express a wide range of social or political beliefs. To explore this concept, I have distilled my imagery into combinations of five themes: science, religion, sports, war, and economics. Each one of these disciplines promises some kind of truth or absolutism yet is subject to manipulation to suit the needs of contemporary ideology. The relationships that develop among these cultural strands become contradictory, paradoxical, or unstable.

 

Painting is an ideal vehicle for exploring these ideas as the painted image carries tremendous cultural weight. Painting also remains a vital part of contemporary art and as such is a concept-driven expression of the individual. Equally as important, there is an inherent expectation of discovering truth through the hand of the artist in the painted, narrative image. This is a powerful force in the mind of the viewer. I present the possibility of meaning through various appropriations and arrangements, however, it is up to the viewer to find the connections and relationships necessary for a personal interpretation.

 

b i o   | | |

TOM WERGZYNOWSKI is a studio artist who uses traditional methods of oil painting to explore the disjointed nature of contemporary culture. His primary body of work explores this theme through a constructed symbolic system that reflects both a personal and societal desire for meaning.

 

He received BA degrees from the University of South Carolina in both History and Art Studio and his MFA in Painting from the University of Alabama. He has been a full-time instructor at the University of Alabama since 2006, where he teaches both Art Studio and Art History classes. The process of teaching Art History has greatly informed his work, especially in thinking about how artists chronicle the times in which they live. He has been regularly exhibiting work for close to twenty years, most recently at the Wiregrass Museum of Art in Dothan (AL), Lowe Mill in Huntsville (AL), and the Delaplaine Visual Arts Center in Frederick (MD). He is also a past recipient of an emergency support grant from the Joan Mitchell Foundation.

 

Tom lives in Tuscaloosa (AL) with his wife, studio mate, colleague, and frequent collaborator, artist Charlotte Wegrzynowski, and two sons, Sam and Ben.

Press Release

3 September 2019 (New Orleans, LA) JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY proudly presents the 23rd Annual NO DEAD ARTISTS International Juried Exhibition of Contemporary Art. For the 2019 installment of the exhibition, the gallery will host works by sixteen artists hailing from across the United States, as well as, Germany and Norway. The exhibition will be on view from 3 to 27 September 2019, with an opening reception on 7 September, 6-9 pm in conjunction with the Arts District New Orleans’ (ADNO) First Saturday Gallery Openings.

 

The NO DEAD ARTISTS exhibition was founded by Jonathan Ferrara in 1995 to give a voice to emerging artists. The exhibition's name is derived from the old adage that artists never achieve success until they are dead. NO DEAD ARTISTSturns that notion on its head and often gives emerging artists their first break in the art world. In the 90's, the exhibition was open to New Orleans-based artists and subsequently grew to include artists of Louisiana, then becoming a national juried exhibition in 2010. And in 2014, the exhibition went international.  Now in its 23rd iteration, the exhibition has been a springboard for numerous artists; leading to national press coverage, recognition, gallery representation and acquisitions by museums and other prominent collections.

 

Each year the gallery invites a panel of renowned arts professionals and collectors to select the newest creative talents for around the world. Past jurors have included: Prospect.1 Founder and Curator, Dan Cameron; Museum Director, Billie Milam Weisman; Collector and Philanthropist, Beth Rudin DeWoody; MacArthur Fellow, John Scott; Whitney Trustee and Ballroom Marfa Co-founder, Fairfax Dorn; NOMA Director, Susan Taylor; former Director of the Andy Warhol Museum, Eric Shiner; Director of the National Art Gallery of the Bahamas and Founder/Artistic Director of the VOLTA Fair, Amanda Coulson; ArtBridge Curator, Jordana Zeldin; Collector and MoMA Board Member, Lawrence Benenson; CAMH Director, Bill Arning; Collector and Brooklyn Museum Board Member, Stephanie Ingrassia; Collector and Prospect New Orleans Biennial board member, Nick Mayor; Director/Owner of Art Market Productions, Max Fishko; Associate Curator at the Contemporary Jewish Museum, San Francisco, Anastasia James; Director of Perez Art Museum Miami and Artistic Director of Prospect.3 Biennial, New Orleans, Franklin Sirmans; collector Lester Marks; McNay Art Museum Curator, René Paul Barilleaux; and actress and collector, CCH Pounder.

 

::: The 2019 NO DEAD ARTISTS Jury :::

 

ROBYN DUNN SCHWARZ

Before joining Matthew Clayton Brown in 2006, Robyn was an Assistant Vice President in Impressionist and Modern Art at Sotheby’s for nine years. Prior to Sotheby’s, she worked with George Stern Fine Arts, Los Angeles, a leading art dealer specializing in California paintings, and Nedra Matteucci’s Fenn Galleries, Santa Fe. Robyn has been a member of the Appraisers Association of America since 2007 and is certified in the Uniform Standards of Professional Appraisal Practice (USPAP). She is also a board member and past president of the Contemporary Art Center, New Orleans, trustee of the Metairie Park Country Day School and a member of Art Table and the Director’s Council of the New Orleans Museum of Art.

 

CARMON COLANGELO

Carmon Colangelo is the inaugural dean of the Sam Fox School of Design & Visual Arts, bringing together Washington University’s historic Colleges of Art and Architecture and the distinguished Mildred Lane Kemper Art Museum into a vibrant creative community.  Colangelo is a widely exhibited artist who combines digital and traditional processes to create colorful, mixed-media prints and paintings that explore ideas about the human experience and contemporary condition. He earned a BFA in printmaking and painting from the University of Windsor in Ontario and an MFA in printmaking from Louisiana State University. Colangelo has been featured in more than 40 solo and 150 group exhibitions and his work has been collected by such museums as the National Museum of American Art, the Whitney Museum of American Art, and the Saint Louis Art Museum. 

 

NICK KORNILOFF

As Executive Vice President, Partner and Show Director of Art Miami LLC, Korniloff oversees the management and creative direction for Art Miami, CONTEXT, Aqua Art Miami, Art New York, Palm Beach Modern & Contemporary, Art Wynwood, Art Southampton and Art Silicon Valley/San Francisco. He is also one of the founders of LUXE Show Ventures. In 2008, Korniloff took the helm at Art Miami LLC and swiftly revitalized Art Miami, now in its 28th year.  By expanding the high-quality and diverse group of international exhibitors, galleries, and institutions, Korniloff reorganized the fair to attract an impressive audience of collectors, dealers, curators and artists.  This expansion and move to the Wynwood Arts District successfully repositioned the show as the city’s most important and anchor fair during Art Week, which takes place in early December when thousands descend upon Miami for a flurry of cultural events and fairs.  Art Miami is now the number one attended fair in America and second globally it now attracts around 85,000 attendees annually.

Of the approximate 3,000 artworks submitted to this jury by over 600 artists worldwide, only sixteen artists were selected to have their work exhibited at JONATHAN FERRARA GALLERY.

 

::: The 23rd Annual NO DEAD ARTISTS Finalists :::

ABE ABRAHAM - New York, NY

CHRIS BARNARD - New Haven, CT

HALE EKINCI - Chicago, IL

MAGGIE EVANS - Savannah, GA

FELICIA FORTE - Hamtramck, MI

LESLIE FRY - Winooski, VT

JAMMIE HOLMES - Dallas, TX

MOMMA TRIED - New Orleans, LA

KRISTIN MOORE - Austin, TX

MAIDY MORHOUS - Del Mar, CA

ELENA SOTERAKIS - Brooklyn, NY

SUSANNA STORCH - Mainz, Germany

CARLIE TROSCLAIR - New Orleans, LA

HALFDAN WARDEMAN - Oslo, Norway

DEBORAH WASSERMAN - Jackson Heights, NY

TOM WEGRZYNOWSKI - Tuscaloosa, AL

 

Comprised of painting, sculpture, drawing, photography, printmaking, mixed-media, installation, ceramics, video and new media, NO DEAD ARTISTS continues to exhibit a great diversity in media with a cohesive cross-section of the pulse of Contemporary Art. Presenting just over 30 artworks ranging in media, style and purpose from the augmented reality installation by local artistic duo “Momma Tried” to the voyeuristic canvases of German painter Susannah Storch. Other exhibition highlights include the return of Tom Wegrzynowski’s socio-political paintings which were previously included in the 2014 exhibition, Chris Barnard’s monumental-sized, architectural paintings and Abe Abraham’s figurative video work. For the 23rd year in a row, No Dead Artists showcases the latest trends and talent in Contemporary Art adhering to its mission of giving emerging artists a platform to have their creative voices heard.

 

For the grand prize of the exhibition, one of the selected jury winning artists will be awarded a solo exhibition in 2019 at JFG. Previous recipient awardees: Nikki Rosato (2012, Washington D.C.), Marna Shopoff (2014, Indianapolis), Richelle Gribble (Los Angeles, 2015) and Jenny Day (Santa Fe, 2017) not only received the solo show at gallery, but also, have successfully gone on to exhibit in art fairs in New York, Miami, Basel (Switzerland), Leipzig (Germany), San Francisco, Houston and Seattle and other traveling exhibitions and museums worldwide. These artists and the No Dead Artists exhibition have garnered great interest from curators, museums and press as well as been acquired by many prominent public and private collections. . . Stay tuned for the announcement of the 2018 winner at the close of the exhibition.

 

For more information, press or sales inquiries please contact the gallery director Matthew Weldon Showman at 504.343.6827 or matthew@jonathanferraragallery.com. Please join the conversation with JFG on Facebook (@JonathanFerraraGallery), Twitter (@JFerraraGallery), and Instagram (@JonathanFerraraGallery) via the hashtags:  #NoDeadArtists, #NDA2019 and #JonathanFerraraGallery.